November 2015

This Day in History… November 18, 1928

U.S. #4343 – Since 2007, Disney films have opened with a brief clip of Mickey behind the wheel.

Premiere of Steamboat Willie

On November 18, 1928, Mickey Mouse became a household name with the release of Steamboat Willie.

In 1917 a young man dropped out of school at age 16 to join the Army and fight in World War I. Rejected by recruiters, he joined the Red Cross instead and was sent to France to drive an ambulance. There was no work to be found when he came home, until a favor from a friend got him a job in an art studio. That began the wonderful journey of Walt Disney, the cartoonist who brought joy to millions around the world.

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This Day in History… November 17, 1820

U.S. #2386 pictures Palmer, his sloop Hero, and an outline of Antarctica.

First Americans Sight Antarctica

On November 17, 1820, Nathaniel Palmer and his crew became the first Americans (and the third group of explorers) to see Antarctica.

Born in 1799 in Stonington, Connecticut, Palmer had a life-long love of the sea. As a child he played in his father’s shipyard and began working on his first ship at just 14 years old.

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This Day in History… November 16, 1907

U.S. #1092 – “Arrows to Atoms” reflects Oklahoma’s evolution from the frontier days to the atomic age.

Oklahoma Becomes 46th State

On November 16, 1907, Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory were merged to create the state of Oklahoma.

For more than 100 years, the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians had lived in close proximity to Europeans in the southeastern U.S. These people had adopted a great deal of European culture and were known as the Five Civilized Tribes. In 1819, the U.S. government began pressuring the Five Civilized Tribes to move west to Oklahoma. At that time, Oklahoma was mostly unpopulated. The government built Fort Towson and Fort Gibson, and forced the Five Tribes to move there.

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This Day in History… November 15, 1864

U.S. #257 – Prior to the war, Sherman had served in the South and considered it a second home.

Sherman’s March to the Sea

After burning Atlanta, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman embarked on his month-long March to the Sea on November 15, 1864.

Following his capture of Atlanta on September 2, 1864, Major General William T. Sherman turned his sights to Savannah, an important port city for the Confederacy. Traveling away from his supply lines, Sherman’s forces would forage area plantations for provisions. He wanted more from this campaign than to capture Southern land – he hoped to destroy the Confederacy’s ability to continue the war.

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This Day in History… November 14, 1851

U.S. #3502q – Rockwell Kent illustration created for a 1930 reprinting of Moby-Dick.

Literary Classic Moby-Dick Published

One of the greatest books in American literature, Moby-Dick, was first published in the U.S. on November 14, 1851.

Born in New York City, Herman Melville served in the merchant marines and U.S. Navy, and spent two years on the whaleship Acushnet. He published his first novel, Typee, in 1846. The book was a success and spurred a sequel. Melville wrote another three relatively successful books before he was inspired to write Moby-Dick.

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This Day in History… November 13, 1956

U.S. #3937e – Over 17,500 African Americans boycotted the Montgomery buses during the year-long strike.

Supreme Court Rules Bus Segregation Illegal

The Civil Rights Movement took a major step forward on November 13, 1956, when the Supreme Court ruled that the bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, was unconstitutional.

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