April 2016

This Day in History… April 18, 1775

Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride 

U.S. #1059A – Revere went on to serve as a lieutenant colonel during the war and silversmith in the years after.

On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere took his historic ride to warn the people of Lexington and Concord that the British were coming.

Born in Boston, Paul Revere was a leader in the patriot group known as The Sons of Liberty, whose members participated in the Boston Tea Party. In 1774, he was hired by the Boston committee of Correspondence and the Massachusetts Committee of Safety to work as an express rider. In that role, he would carry news, messages, and copies of resolutions to and from New York and Philadelphia.

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This Day in History… April 17, 1524

Verrazzano Explores New York Harbor 

U.S. #1258 – This stamp was issued on the day the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge opened.

On April 17, 1524, Giovanni da Verrazzano became the first European to see New York harbor.

Giovanni da Verrazzano was born in Val di Freve, near Florence, Italy around 1485. He had an interest in the sea and exploration from an early age. His first expeditions were to Egypt and Syria, locations that many had long thought were nearly impossible to reach.

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This Day in History… April 16, 1912

First Woman to Fly Across the English Channel

U.S. #C128 – Quimby is one of few women honored on U.S. Airmail stamps.

On April 16, 1912, Harriet Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel.

Quimby was born in Arcadia, Michigan, on May 11, 1875. Her family moved to California in the early 1900s, after which she became a journalist. In 1903 she moved to New York City to take a job as a theater critic for Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly. During her nine-year career with the magazine, she reviewed plays, the circus, comedians, and the new form of entertainment – moving pictures. Traveling to Europe, Mexico, Cuba, and Egypt, she published over 250 articles.

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This Day in History… April 15, 1817

America’s Oldest School for the Deaf 

U.S. #1861 – Gallaudet served as the school’s first principal until 1830.

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc founded the first permanent school for the deaf in America on April 15, 1817.

The first school for the deaf in America opened in 1815. It was opened by William Bolling in Cobbs, Virginia, with John Braidwood serving as the teacher. The school was short-lived, however, closing in the fall of 1816. It was Thomas Gallaudet who would go on to found the first permanent school for the deaf.

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This Day in History… April 15, 1865

Death of President Lincoln 

U.S. #77 – The first U.S. mourning stamp was issued a year after Lincoln’s death.

On April 15, 1865, President Lincoln died less than 12 hours after being shot by John Wilkes Booth.

By early April 1865, the Civil War was drawing to a close. The Union Army had taken the Confederate Capitol at Richmond and Robert E. Lee had surrendered his troops at Appomattox Court House in Virginia.

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This Day in History… April 14, 1912

The Titanic Sinks 

U.S. #3191l honors the 1997 James Cameron movie about the Titanic.

One of the most well known maritime disasters in history occurred on April 14, 1912, when the Titanic hit an iceberg and sank.

Construction on the RMS Titanic began on March 31, 1909, and was funded by J.P. Morgan and the International Mercantile Marine Company. The Titanic, along with the White Star ships Olympic and Britannic, were designed to be the largest and most luxurious ships of the time.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 10 Comments