January 2017

This Day in History… January 25, 1915

First Official Transcontinental Telephone Call

U.S. #3183e honors the completion of the Transcontinental telephone line.

On January 25, 1915, the first official transcontinental telephone call from New York to San Francisco was made.

Following Alexander Graham Bell’s invention of the telephone in 1876, telephone service spread quickly. By 1890, the Bell telephone had spread to most major cities in the United States. And a year later, the first commercial long distance line extended 45 miles. Phone service between New York City and Chicago began in 1892.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 11 Comments

This Day in History… January 24, 1908

Boy Scouts Movement Begins

U.S. #995 was issued on the opening day of the 1950 Boy Scout Jamboree in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

On January 24, 1908, Robert Baden-Powell published the first installment of Scouting for Boys, marking the start of the Boy Scouts.

In the 1880s and 1890s, Lieutenant General of the British Army Robert Baden-Powell was stationed in India and Africa. Much of what he taught his soldiers was based on his fondness of woodcraft and military scouting, which was intended to help them survive in the wilderness. Realizing that the troops needed to be more independent, and not just blindly follow their officer’s orders, Powell wrote, Aids to Scouting.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 7 Comments

This Day in History… January 23, 1849

America’s First Female Doctor 

U.S. #1399 was issued on the 125th anniversary of Blackwell’s graduation.

On January 23, 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman in America to graduate from medical school.

Blackwell was born on February 3, 1821, in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England. Her family moved to America in 1832, living first in New York and later Cincinnati, Ohio. As a young woman, Blackwell opened a school with her sisters to help raise money for her family, though it eventually closed.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 5 Comments

This Day in History… January 22, 1901

Death of Queen Victoria 

Great Britain #Black1xxx – Victoria insisted the portrait of her on the Penny Black be the only image of her on Britain’s postage stamps.

On January 22, 1901, the longest-reigning British monarch up to that time, Queen Victoria, died.

The queen was born on May 24, 1819, to Edward, Duke of Kent and Victoria, Princess of Saxe-Coburg of Germany at Kensington Palace. She was baptized in the name of Alexandrina Victoria after her cousin, Tsar, Alexander I of Russia. Although her first language was German, Drina (as she was called at home) also learned English and French.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 8 Comments

This Day in History… January 21, 1954

U.S. Launches First Nuclear Submarine

U.S. #BK279 – America’s first preside booklet honoring a century of U.S. Navy submarines.

On January 21, 1954, the USS Nautilus, the world’s first operational nuclear-powered submarine, was launched.

Accounts of boats submerging in the water date back to the 1560s, though the first verifiable vessel was designed and built in 1620.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 3 Comments

This Day in History… January 20, 1937

First January Presidential Inauguration Day 

U.S. #1284 from the Prominent Americans Series.

On January 20, 1937, Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first U.S. president to be sworn in under the new rules of the 20th Amendment.

The U.S. Constitution originally set the length of terms for federal elected officials. But it didn’t set specific dates for when those terms began or ended.

Continue reading

Posted in January 2017, This Day in History | 2 Comments