July 2017

This Day in History… July 31, 1921

Happy Birthday Whitney Young 

U.S. #1875 – Young was the fourth honoree in the Black Heritage Series.

Civil rights leader Whitney Moore Young, Jr., was born on July 31, 1921, in Shelby County, Kentucky.

Young’s father was president of the Lincoln Institute, an all African American boarding school, and also served as president of the Kentucky Negro Educational Association. His mother was teacher and the first female postmistress in Kentucky.

Young attended the Lincoln Institute and graduated as valedictorian in 1937. He attended Kentucky State University where he played on the basketball team and was voted president of his senior class. During World War II Young worked on a road construction crew of African American soldiers that were supervised by Southern white officers. The tensions he witnessed there led him to pursue a career in race relations.

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This Day in History… July 30, 1993

National Postal Museum Opens 

U.S. #2779 pictures Ben Franklin, a printing press, mail rider, and Independence Hall.

On July 30, 1993, the Smithsonian National Postal Museum opened in Washington, D.C.

The history of the National Postal Museum (NPM) dates back 1886. It was that year that the National Philatelic Collection was first established with the donation of a sheet of 10¢ Confederate stamps. In the coming years, individuals, foreign governments, and American government agencies helped the collection grow through donations. Today it consists of more than 5.9 million items.

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This Day in History… July 29, 1998

First U.S. Semi-Postal 

U.S. #B1 pictures the mythical “goddess of the hunt” – a symbol of strength.

On July 29, 1998, the USPS issued its first semi-postal stamp to fund breast cancer research.

Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose. Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current postal rate, but they also contribute a portion of their cost to a charitable cause.

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This Day in History… July 28, 1952

Death of Brien McMahon

U.S. #1200 was issued on the 10th anniversary of McMahon’s death.

Connecticut Senator and chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy Brien McMahon died on July 28, 1952, in Washington, D.C.

McMahon was born on October 6, 1903, in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale law school he practiced law, and then became a city judge in 1933. He went on to serve as a special assistant to the Attorney General of the United States and later Assistant Attorney General of the U.S., in charge of the Department of Justice Criminal Division.

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This Day in History… July 27, 1995

Opening of Korean War Veterans Memorial

U.S. #3803 was issued on this day in 2003.

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was officially dedicated on July 27, 1995, the 42nd anniversary of the armistice that ended the Korean War.

Plans for the memorial wall date back to the 1980s. Congress officially approved it on April 20, 1986, with the project managed by the Korean War Veterans Memorial Advisory Board and the American Battle Monuments Commission.

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This Day in History… July 26, 1788

New York Becomes 11th State to Join the Union 

U.S. #2346 was issued on New York’s 200th anniversary.

On July 26, 1788, New York ratified the U.S. Constitution, becoming America’s 11th state.

Two of the most powerful Indian groups in North America lived in New York, the Algonquian family and the Iroquois. These tribes were large and well organized, especially the Iroquois. The Iroquois federation was the most efficient North American Indian government.

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