October 2016

This Day in History… October 7, 1765

Stamp Act Congress Meets To Protest Unfair Taxation 

British proof of American tax stamp – It includes the phrase, Honi soit qui mal y pense, which is a British motto meaning “May he be shamed who thinks badly of it.”

British proof of American tax stamp – It includes the phrase, Honi soit qui mal y pense, which is a British motto meaning “May he be shamed who thinks badly of it.”

In response to Parliament’s Stamp Act of 1765, American colonists assembled in New York City on October 7 to organize a unified protest.

Since the end of the French and Indian War, the British Parliament had been looking for new ways to increase its revenues from overseas colonies. Among the steps they took was the passage of the Stamp Act of 1765, which placed direct taxation on the colonies for the first time. It forced colonists to buy a British tax stamp for every official document they obtained.

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This Day in History… October 6, 1683

Establishment of Germantown, PA

U.S. #2040 – A joint-issue marking the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Germantown.

U.S. #2040 – A joint-issue marking the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Germantown.

On October 6, 1683, thirty-three Germans arrived in Pennsylvania to establish the first major German settlement in America.

The Swedish were the first people to establish a permanent settlement in modern-day Pennsylvania. In 1643, they made Tinicum Island, near Philadelphia, which was then the capital of the colony of New Sweden.

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This Day in History… October 5, 1829

Happy Birthday Chester A. Arthur 

U.S. #826 from the Presidential Series.

U.S. #826 from the Presidential Series.

Chester Alan Arthur was born October 5, 1829, in Fairfield, Vermont.

When Arthur, known as “Chet” to his friends, was 15 years old, he entered Union College. He graduated in 1848 and began teaching school. Arthur studied law on his own, then moved to New York City and was admitted to the bar in 1854. He became known for cases involving the civil rights of blacks.

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This Day in History… October 4, 1822

Happy Birthday Rutherford Hayes 

U.S. #563 – Click the image to read about America’s first “First Day of Issue” ceremony.

U.S. #563 – Click the image to read about America’s first “First Day of Issue” ceremony.

Rutherford Birchard Hayes was born October 4, 1822, in Delaware, Ohio.

Hayes attended private schools in Ohio and Connecticut, and then went to Kenyon College, where he graduated first in his class in 1842. He studied law in Ohio for a year before entering Harvard Law School. After graduation, Hayes began practicing in Lower Sandusky, Ohio. In 1849 he moved to Cincinnati, where he became a successful defense lawyer and gained a reputation for defending fugitive slaves. It was here that Hayes married Lucy Ware Webb. She was a graduate of Cincinnati’s Wesleyan Women’s College, making Lucy Hayes the first President’s wife to graduate from college.

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This Day in History… October 3, 1985

Launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis 

U.S. #3261 has a scrambled indicia that can only be seen with a U.S.P.S. decoder. Hidden are the names of six NASA shuttles, including Atlantis.

U.S. #3261 has a scrambled indicia that can only be seen with a U.S.P.S. decoder. Hidden are the names of six NASA shuttles, including Atlantis.

On October 3, 1985, the Space Shuttle Atlantis made its maiden flight.

Atlantis is America’s fourth operational space shuttle. The contract to build the shuttle was awarded on January 29, 1979, to Rockwell International. Construction on the shuttle began the following year, on March 3. Following the tradition of naming space shuttles after historic ships, Atlantis was named after a two-masted boat that had been the main research vessel of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts between 1930 and 1966.

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This Day in History… October 2, 1871

Happy Birthday Cordell Hull 

U.S. #1235 was issued days after Hull’s 92nd birthday.

U.S. #1235 was issued days after Hull’s 92nd birthday.

America’s longest-serving Secretary of State, Cordell Hull, was born on October 2, 1871, in Olympus, Overton County (now Pickett County), Tennessee.

As a child, Hull attended classes at a one-room schoolhouse built by his father. An excellent speaker from a young age, Hull delivered his first public speech at the age of 16. By the time he was 19, Hull was elected chairman of the Clay County Democratic Party. Meanwhile, he also attended Cumberland School of Law, where he graduated in 1891 and was then admitted to the bar.

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Posted in October 2016, This Day in History | 8 Comments