This Day in History

This Day in History… April 11, 1925

Special Handling Stamps

US #QE4 was issued on this day in 1925.

On April 11, 1925, the US Post Office issued its first Special Handling stamp, #QE4.

The US Postal Service Act of 1925 clarified what made up the different classes of mail.  Everything that did not fall into the first two classes of mail (written matter and periodical publications) was divided by weight.  If it weighed less than eight ounces, it was third class, and if it weighed eight ounces or more, it was fourth-class mail.

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This Day in History… April 10, 1794

Birth of Matthew C. Perry 

US #1021 pictures Perry’s ships in Tokyo Bay with Mount Fuji in the background.

Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry was born on April 10, 1794, in South Kingstown, Rhode Island.

Born to a naval captain, Perry was the younger brother of Oliver Hazard Perry.  Navy life was in his blood and Perry began his career at the age of 15 as a midshipman aboard the USS Revenge, under his older brother’s command.

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This Day in History… April 9, 1954

First Stamp Issued in Liberty Series 

US #1041 was the first U.S. bi-colored definitive with a denomination less than $1.

On April 9, 1954, the USPS introduced a new set of stamps, the Liberty Series, with the issue of an 8¢ red, white, and blue Statue of Liberty stamp.

The Liberty Series was first announced in late 1953, as a replacement for the popular Presidential Series (also known as the Prexies), which had been in use for 15 years.  The new series took its name from the first stamp to be issued, picturing the Statue of Liberty.

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This Day in History… April 8, 1975

Voyageurs National Park

US #C148 from the Scenic American Landscapes Airmail Series.

On April 8, 1975, an Act of Congress officially established Voyageurs National Park.

Native Americans first began living in the Voyageurs National Park area around 10,000 years ago.  Later, people found the waterways as they followed animal and plant populations to where they were most plentiful. Today, there are 18 Native American tribes culturally related to Voyageurs National Park.  Those that have been in the area the longest are the Algonquian-speaking groups such as the Ojibwe, Cree, and Assiniboine.  The Ojibwe were the main occupants from the early 1700s on.

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This Day in History… April 7, 1740

Birth of Haym Salomon

US #1561 was the third stamp in the Contributors to the Cause Series, honoring some of the war’s lesser-known figures.

Haym Salomon was born on April 7, 1740, in Leszno, Poland. 

As a young man, Salomon traveled throughout Western Europe and learned a great deal about finance and other languages.  He returned home to Poland in 1770, and spent some time in England before immigrating to the US in 1775.

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This Day in History… April 6, 1869

The American Museum of Natural History

US #1387-90 were issued to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the museum’s opening.

On April 6, 1869, the American Museum of Natural History is established in New York City. 

The museum was largely the dream of naturalist Dr. Albert S. Bickmore.  For several years, Bickmore lobbied extensively for the creation of a natural history museum in New York. 

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