This Day in History

This Day in History… May 2, 1908

“Take Me Out to the Ball Game” 

US #4341 was issued for the song’s 100th anniversary in 2008.

On May 2, 1908, “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” was submitted to the US Copyright Office. Neither of the men involved in its creation had ever seen a baseball game.

Earlier in 1908, songwriter Jack Norworth was riding the subway in New York when he happened to glance out the window and find inspiration in a sign. It simply said, “Baseball Today – Polo Grounds.”

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Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 2 Comments

This Day in History… May 1, 1929

Kansas-Nebraska Stamps 

US #658 was overprinted on US #552.

On May 1, 1929, the Kansas-Nebraska stamps were officially placed on sale.

During the 1920s, a rash of post office robberies baffled US postal inspectors. Burglars were stealing stamps in one state and then selling them in another. As the Post Office Department searched for a solution to put an end to the problem, the robberies became more frequent and more widespread, especially in the Midwest.

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Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 3 Comments

This Day in History… April 30, 1941

US Savings Bonds 

US #2534 was issued on this day in 1991.

On April 30, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt announced a new series of US Savings Bonds and bought the first one himself the following day.

The practice of the government selling securities to the public dates back to 1776. That year, private citizens bought more than $27 million in government bonds to help pay for the American Revolution. They put their trust in their new government that they would be repaid. And indeed, they were all repaid, and on time, proving the system worked and paving the way for a new American tradition.

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Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… April 29, 1947

First US Aerogram

US #UC16 – America’s first aerogram, issued on this day in 1947.

On April 29, 1947, the US issued its first aerogram, then called an air letter sheet.

In the early days of the mail, letter sheets were the common way to send letters. Messages were written on paper that was folded and sealed. Some postal authorities would charge by the amount of paper used, so using an envelope would make mailing a letter more expensive. As these laws changed and envelopes became the common practice, letter sheets fell out of favor but were still used on occasion in the 1900s.

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Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 5 Comments

This Day in History… April 28, 1956

Opening of FIPEX

US #1076 – Issued on the third day of the show, this stamp pictures the convention hall as well as the Columbus Monument in Barcelona, Spain.

The Fifth International Philatelic Exhibition (FIPEX) opened its doors to a record 60,000 visitors on April 28, 1956.

America’s fifth international philatelic exhibition was planned in conjunction with the opening of a brand new exhibition hall, the New York Coliseum at Columbus Circle. The $35 million, 323,000-square-foot coliseum had begun construction in 1954.

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Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 5 Comments

This Day in History… April 27, 1896

Birth of Rogers Hornsby 

US #3408f from the Legends of Baseball sheet.

Rogers Hornsby, Sr., was born on April 27, 1896, in Winters, Texas.

The youngest of six children, Hornsby began playing baseball at a young age, once stating, “I can’t remember anything that happened before I had a baseball in my hand.” When he was 10, Hornsby worked as a messenger boy in a meat packing plant, where he occasionally played as an infielder on the company team. By the time he was 15, Hornsby was playing on semi-professional baseball teams.

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Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 7 Comments