September 2016

This Day in History… September 30, 1935

Dedication of the Hoover Dam 

U.S. #774 was issued the same day as the dedication ceremony.

U.S. #774 was issued the same day as the dedication ceremony.

On September 30, 1935, President Franklin Roosevelt presided over the dedication ceremony of the Boulder Dam (the name was later changed to honor Herbert Hoover).

As early as 1900, Black Canyon and Boulder Canyon were studied to consider the possibility that either might be able to support a dam to control floods, provide irrigation water, and create hydroelectric power. Severe flooding of the Colorado River in 1905 spurred this movement and necessitated the building of a dam to control the waters.

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This Day in History… September 29, 1910

Death of Artist Winslow Homer

U.S. #1207 pictures Breezing Up (A Fair Wind).

U.S. #1207 pictures Breezing Up (A Fair Wind).

On September 29, 1910, one of America’s greatest painters, Winslow Homer died in Prouts Neck, Maine.

Winslow Homer was born on February 24, 1836, in Boston, Massachusetts. The second of three sons, Homer’s mother was a talented watercolorist that began teaching him to paint at a young age. Though Homer was an average student, he proved himself to be a talented artist early on.

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This Day in History… September 28, 1781

Siege Of Yorktown Begins

U.S. #703 honors the commanding generals at Yorktown: Washington, Rochambeau, and Degrasse.

U.S. #703 honors the commanding generals at Yorktown: Washington, Rochambeau, and Degrasse.

On September 28, 1781, American forces launched the last major land battle of the Revolutionary War – the Siege of Yorktown.

During the American Revolution, the ability to resupply armies, deploy troops, and transport munitions stored in towns along Virginia’s inland water routes was dependent on control of the Chesapeake Bay. The British campaign to secure this vital region ultimately led to the surrender of British General Cornwallis and an American victory in their war for independence.

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This Day in History… September 27, 1777

Lancaster Becomes U.S. Capital for a Day

U.S. #C150 – Today Lancaster County is considered the center of Pennsylvania Dutch Country.

U.S. #C150 – Today Lancaster County is considered the center of Pennsylvania Dutch Country.

On September 27, 1777, Lancaster, Pennsylvania served as the nation’s capital for a single day.

Leading up to and during the American Revolution, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was America’s unofficial capital. It was there the Continental Congress first met in 1774 and signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It was a bustling trade center and served as headquarters of sorts of the new American government.

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This Day in History… September 26, 1774

Happy Birthday Johnny Appleseed 

U.S. #1317 was the first issue in the American Folklore Series.

U.S. #1317 was the first issue in the American Folklore Series.

John Chapman, popularly known as Johnny Appleseed, was born on September 26, 1774, in Leominster, Massachusetts. His birthplace, identified by a granite marker, is on a street now called Johnny Appleseed Lane.

Johnny’s father went to fight in the Revolution, but returned home when his mother died after childbirth. His father remarried and had 10 more children. When Johnny was 18, he convinced his 11-year-old half brother embark on a journey west with him. The two boys lived off the land and wandered the west for 13 years before their father moved the family out to meet them in Ohio.

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This Day in History… September 25, 1513

Balboa Discovers Pacific Ocean

U.S. #401 was issued for the Panama-Pacific Exposition, which honored Balboa’s discover as well as the construction of the Panama Canal.

U.S. #401 was issued for the Panama-Pacific Exposition, which honored Balboa’s discovery as well as the construction of the Panama Canal.

On September 25, 1513, explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa became the first European to lay eyes on the Pacific Ocean.

Balboa was born in 1475 in Jerez de los Caballeros, Spain. Following Christopher Columbus’ famed voyage to the New World in 1492, Balboa was inspired to become an explorer himself. He made his first voyage to the Americas in 1500 with Rodrigo de Bastidas. However, along the journey their ship was badly damaged and they had no choice but to settle on Hispaniola. Balboa attempted to make a life for himself as a planter and pig farmer, but was ultimately unsuccessful. Unable to pay off his rising debts he conceived a plan to escape the island and his debtors.

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