September 2017

This Day in History… September 24, 1936

Happy Birthday Jim Henson 

U.S. #3944k pictures a 1986 photo of Henson.

James Maury Henson was born on September 24, 1936, in Greenville, Mississippi.

Growing up in Maryland, Henson had an abiding interest in television. He was largely influenced by TV puppeteer Burr Tillstrom of Kukla, Fran and Ollie. While still in high school, Henson got the chance to produce puppet shows on a local Saturday morning television program.

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This Day in History… September 23, 1889

Birth of Walter Lippmann 

U.S. #1849 from the Great Americans series.

Journalist Walter Lippmann was born on September 23, 1889, in New York City, New York.

Born into an upper-middle class family, Lippmann attended New York’s Dwight School. He went on to attend Harvard University where he focused on philosophy, German, and French. He graduated in three years and later joined the New York Socialist Party with Sinclair Lewis.

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This Day in History… September 22, 1956

First U.S. Commemorative on Colored Paper

U.S. #1083 was issued on this day in 1956.

On September 22, 1956, the U.S. Post Office issued its first commemorative stamp on colored paper.

In 1956, the U.S. Post Office began work on a stamp to honor the 200th anniversary of Nassau Hall. The hall is the oldest building on the Princeton University campus and was the largest building in New Jersey at the time it was built.

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This Day in History… September 21, 1948

Gold Star Mothers Stamp 

U.S. #969 was issued on this day in 1948.

On September 21, 1948, the U.S. Post Office issued the Gold Star Mothers stamp to honor mothers whose sons had been killed in war. It was the first stamp in eight years to feature women (or women’s organizations), and just the 11th stamp overall to do so.

In 1917, Robert Queissner, an Army captain, designed a flag to honor the service of his sons in World War I. The flag had a blue star on a white field, with a red border. It caught on quickly – by September of the same year, Ohio Governor James Cox had adopted it.

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This Day in History… September 20, 1863

Battle of Chickamauga 

U.S. #2975 – Click the image to read about all the subjects on this sheet.

On September 20, 1863, the first major battle fought in Georgia, the bloody Battle of Chickamauga, came to a close.

Union General William S. Rosecrans had previously had great success in his Tullahoma Campaign and hoped to push Confederate General Braxton Bragg’s Army of the Tennessee out of Chattanooga. Rosecrans consolidated his forces and forced Bragg to flee Chattanooga. Bragg then assembled his troops in Lafayette, Georgia, and prepared to retake Chattanooga.

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This Day in History… September 19, 1676

Jamestown Burns During Bacon’s Rebellion

U.S. #329 – Jamestown was founded 69 years before the rebellion.

On September 19, 1676, Nathaniel Bacon led an irate group of followers into Jamestown and burned nearly all the buildings to the ground.

In the mid-1670s, some Virginia colonists grew concerned over the government’s lack of action in the wake of increasing Native American attacks on their settlements. Among them was Nathaniel Bacon, who also took issue with Virginia’s governor William Berkeley. Bacon felt snubbed after not receiving a political appointment or being allow to trade with the Native Americans. When word spread about a new Indian raiding party, several hundred settlers met and elected Bacon as their leader, essentially beginning the rebellion.

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