This Day in History… March 23, 1909

Teddy Roosevelt Departs for African Safari 

US #1039 from the Liberty Series.

On March 23, 1909, former president Teddy Roosevelt set sail from New York City for a joint expedition with the Smithsonian Institution.

Roosevelt’s term as president ended on March 4, 1909. At 50 years old, he was America’s youngest former president. Roosevelt was anxious to take a break from politics and get out of Washington, DC. At the time, the Smithsonian was building what would become the Museum of Natural History and would need exhibits. Roosevelt, ever a fan of natural history, decided to go on an African safari sponsored by the museum to collect specimens.

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 19 Comments

This Day in History… March 22, 1941

James Stewart Goes to War

US #4197 – Stewart was the 13th honoree in the Legends of Hollywood Series. Click image to order.

On March 22, 1941, James Stewart was inducted into the US Army, making him the first major US movie star to don a military uniform during World War II.

James Stewart developed an early interest in flying and got his pilot’s license in 1938.  Around that same time, he worked with other celebrities to establish Thunderbird Field, a pilot training school in Arizona.

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 9 Comments

This Day in History… March 21, 1918

German Spring Offensive

US #537 was issued in 1919 to commemorate the Allied victory in the war.

On March 21, Germany launched its Spring Offensive in the hopes of tipping the scales of the war before American troops and supplies could reach the front.

German plans for the Spring Offensive began as early as November 1917.  The offensive, also known as Kaiserschlacht (Kaiser’s Battle), was planned and executed by German General Erich Ludendorff, with little input from the German government or Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg.

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… March 20, 1928

Happy Birthday, Mr. Rogers

US #5275 was issued for Rogers’ 90th birthday.

Fred McFeely Rogers was born on March 20, 1928, in Latrobe, Pennsylvania.

Rogers was a shy, introverted child, who often spent time at home alone playing with puppets.  He also suffered from asthma, which also kept him at home.  Rogers would spend his time creating his own world with his toys.

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 8 Comments

This Day in History… March 19, 1869

Pictorial Series Introduced 

US #112 satisfied the local rate plus the rate for unsealed circulars.  Click image to order.

On March 19, 1869, the first US Pictorial stamps were issued.

By early 1868, the then-current US definitive stamps had been in use for over six years and their printing plates were quite worn.  Additionally, the Post Office’s contract with the National Bank Note Company was set to expire in February 1869.  They requested bids for the contract to print new stamps and suggested that “there should be variety in the sizes as well as the designs of the stamps.”

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… March 18, 1855

Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge

US #961 was issued to honor the 100th anniversary of the completion of the temporary bridge in 1848. It pictures the completed double-decker bridge.

On March 18, 1855, the Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge officially opened.

The bridge was the brainchild of Canadian entrepreneur and politician William Hamilton Merritt.  In the summer of 1844, he and his wife were picnicking on the shores of the Niagara River, while reading a letter from their sons, who were touring Europe at the time.  In the letter, their sons marveled at the Freiburg Suspension Bridge in Switzerland.

Continue reading

Posted in March 2019, This Day in History | 5 Comments