This Day in History… June 9, 1534

Cartier Explores St. Lawrence River 

Canada #208 was issued for the 400th anniversary of Cartier’s first trip to Canada.

On June 9, 1534, Jacques Cartier became the first European explorer to travel the St. Lawrence River.

Cartier was born on December 31, 1491, in Saint-Malo, Brittany, France.  In 1534, the bishop of Saint-Malo introduced Cartier to King Francis I and recommended him for a commission to search for a northwest passage to Asia.  The bishop claimed Cartier had previously journeyed to Newfoundland and Brazil, exhibiting his ability to “lead ships to the discovery of new lands in the New World.”

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This Day in History… June 8, 1906

Antiquities Act of 1906 

US #1084 was issued for the 50th anniversary of Devils Tower, the first monument created under the Antiquities Act.

On June 8, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law, giving him and future presidents the authority to create national monuments from federal lands.

Roosevelt was an avid outdoorsman. After the death of his first wife in 1884, Roosevelt moved to the North Dakota Badlands where he set up a ranch. When Roosevelt first came to the Badlands, it was as a hunter. But it was his interest in livestock and cattle ranching that made him stay.

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Posted in June 2018, This Day in History | 6 Comments

This Day in History… June 7, 1917

The Lions Clubs 

US #1326 was issued to publicize the Lions’ Search for Peace essay contest. It also marked the organization’s 50th anniversary.

On June 7, 1917, the Lions Club held their first national meeting in Chicago.

Dr. William P. Woods of Evansville, Indiana created the first iteration of the Lions. He established the Royal Order of Lions on August 8, 1911, as a fraternal organization. After a few years, however, the group decided they wanted to focus more on service and Woods worked on establishing Lions Clubs around 1915.

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Posted in June 2018, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… June 6, 1756

Birth of John Trumbull 

US #1361 was issued to honor Trumbull and pictures his painting, Battle of Bunker’s Hill.

Artist John Trumbull was born on June 6, 1756, in Lebanon, Connecticut.

Trumbull’s father was the governor of Connecticut and the family was descended from early Puritan settlers in the state. As a child, Trumbull suffered an accident that cost him the use of one eye. He went on to attend Harvard at the age of 15, graduating in 1773.

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Posted in June 2018, This Day in History | 5 Comments

This Day in History… June 5, 1883

Orient Express

US #2576 pictures the Orient Express.

On June 5, 1883, the Orient Express made its first trip from Paris to Vienna.

The world’s most luxurious train was the brainchild of Belgian Georges Nagelmackers. Nagelmackers first became interested in trains on a visit to the United States in 1867. Impressed by the railroad sleeping cars on Pullman night trains, he decided to establish a network of similar trains in Europe.

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This Day in History… June 4, 1940

The Miracle of Dunkirk 

US #940 was issued to honor all those that served in WWII.

On June 4, 1940, over 338,000 Allied troops were evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk after being cut off and surrounded there for weeks.

After Germany invaded Poland in September 1939, the United Kingdom sent the British Expeditionary Force to help defend France. There they fought alongside the Belgian Army and the French First, Seventh, and Ninth Armies.

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Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 1 Comment