This Day in History… November 16, 1908

Washington-Franklin Series 

US #332a – This booklet stamp was the first issue in the long-running Washington-Franklin series.

On November 16, 1908, the first stamp in the Washington-Franklin Series was issued.

When the 1902 series was issued, the Post Office Department received numerous complaints from collectors, as well as the public, concerning the stamps’ poor designs. One particular gentleman, Charles Dalton, even wrote to his senator! He severely criticized the Stuart portrait of Washington currently in use on the 2¢ stamp and suggested the profile, taken from the bust by Jean Antoine Houdon, be put back into use.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 2 Comments

This Day in History… November 15, 1864

US #257 – Prior to the war, Sherman had served in the South and considered it a second home.

Sherman’s March to the Sea

After burning Atlanta, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman embarked on his month-long March to the Sea on November 15, 1864.

Following his capture of Atlanta on September 2, 1864, Major General William T. Sherman turned his sights to Savannah, an important port city for the Confederacy. Traveling away from his supply lines, Sherman’s forces would forage area plantations for provisions. He wanted more from this campaign than to capture Southern land – he hoped to destroy the Confederacy’s ability to continue the war.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 9 Comments

This Day in History… November 14, 1832

First Streetcar in America

US #2059-62 – The same man designed three of the four streetcars pictured on these stamps.

On November 14, 1832, the John Mason inaugurated the first streetcar service in America.

One man dominated the history of streetcars in America in the early days of their use.  John Stephenson developed the first streetcar to run on rails.  In general, he presided over the evolution of streetcars as public transportation.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 2 Comments

This Day in History… November 13, 1856

Birth of Louis Brandeis

US #4422c from the Supreme Court Justices issue.

Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis was born on November 13, 1856, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Brandeis grew up surrounded by books, music, and politics.  He was a serious student and graduated from high school at the age of 14.  He then left the country for a few years with his family and attended the Annenschule in Dresden, Saxony.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 7 Comments

This Day in History… November 12, 1954

Ellis Island Closes 

US #3182i from the Celebrate the Century: 1900s sheet.

On November 12, 1954, Ellis Island closed, after serving as America’s busiest immigration inspection station for over 60 years.

In 994 A.D., Native Americans began inhabiting what are now Liberty and Ellis Islands.  These islands were originally known as Oyster Islands, named for the many shell beds in the area.  Oysters were likely a major food source for the Native Americans during this time. When Europeans came to the Hudson River, disease and other factors forced the Native Americans to move north or west.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… November 11, 1918

Armistice Ends World War I Fighting 

US #5300 was issued earlier this year to honor the centennial of the war.

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month (November 11, 1918), the world’s warring nations agreed to cease fighting, bringing about the end of the Great War.

When the war first began in 1914, America resolved to stay out of it. Though America offered aid and supplies to the Allies, President Woodrow Wilson vowed to remain neutral. But as the war dragged on, German hostility toward America grew worse.

Continue reading

Posted in November 2018, This Day in History | 7 Comments