This Day in History… March 4, 1924

“Happy Birthday to You”

US #2272 was part of the 1987 Special Occasions set.  Click image to order. 

On March 4, 1924, the song and melody of “Happy Birthday to You” were printed in a songbook.  One of the world’s most famous songs, it has long been the center of controversy over ownership and copyright status for years.

According to tradition, the tune we all know today as “Happy Birthday” was originally written in the late 1800s as “Good Morning to All.”  Sisters Patty and Mildred Hill claimed they wrote the song for kindergarteners in Louisville, Kentucky.

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This Day in History… March 3, 1845

Star Routes

US #2125 was issued at a meeting of the National Star Route Collectors’ Association. Click image to order.

On March 3, 1845, a congressional act established star routes.  Businesses would carry mail under contract with the post office on these postal routes.

In America’s early history, post riders on horseback carried mail between post offices.  In 1785, the continental congress gave the postmaster general permission to give mail transportation contracts to stagecoach operators.  Though the costs were high and efficiency sometimes lower, stagecoaches were preferred over horseback transportation.

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This Day in History… March 2, 1899

Mount Rainier National Park

US #742 from the 1934 National Parks Issue. Click image to order.

On March 2, 1899, William McKinley signed a bill establishing Mount Rainier National Park.

Mount Rainier was formed by volcanic activity.  In the prehistoric past, debris flowing from Mount Rainier’s volcano formed the lands east of Tacoma and south of Seattle.  At 14,411 feet, it’s the highest peak in the Cascade Range.

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This Day in History… March 1, 1870

Bank Note Series 

US #147 is the first known used Bank Note stamp. Click image to order.

March 1, 1870, is the earliest known use of one of the Bank Note stamps, a long-running set of stamps produced by three different bank note companies.

Less than a year earlier, in March 1869, the Post Office introduced the Pictorial Series.  For the first time in US postal history, our stamps pictured something other than the portraits of national leaders.

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This Day in History… February 28, 1901

Birth of Linus Pauling 

US #4225 from the 2008 American Scientists set.  Click image to order.

American scientist Linus Pauling was born on February 28, 1901, in Portland, Oregon.

When he was a child, Pauling first became interested in chemistry after witnessing his friend conduct experiments with a small lab kit.  He later recalled, “I was simply entranced by chemical phenomena, by the reactions in which substances, often with strikingly different properties, appear; and I hoped to learn more and more about this aspect of the world.” Continue reading

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This Day in History… February 27, 1979

US #1773 was issued on Steinbeck’s 77th birthday. Click image to order.

Start of the Literary Arts Series 

On February 27, 1979, the USPS issued the first stamp in the Literary Arts Series honoring author John Steinbeck.

Leading up to 1979, the USPS began considering a new stamp series to honor American writers.  After receiving over 1,500 suggestions, they selected John Steinbeck to be the first honoree in what would become a long-running series.

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Posted in February 2019, This Day in History | 3 Comments