This Day in History… November 3, 1964

U.S. #2561 pictures the capital as it appeared in 1903.

Washington, D.C. Residents Vote in Their First Presidential Election

Though the District of Columbia has served as our nation’s capital since 1791, its residents didn’t get to vote in their first presidential election until November 3, 1964.

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This Day in History… November 2, 2005

Mystic president Don Sundman trades his 1¢ Z Grill for Bill Gross’ Inverted Jenny Plate-Number Block.

Mystic president Don Sundman trades his 1¢ Z Grill for Bill Gross’ Inverted Jenny Plate-Number Block.

Mystic Trades its Z Grill for the Legendary Inverted Jenny Plate-Number Block

Mystic made stamp history on November 2, 2005, when we traded our 1¢ Z Grill for the unique Inverted Jenny Plate Number Block.

These are the rarest, most famous and valuable U.S. stamps.

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This Day in History… November 1, 1897

U.S. #2004 – When the complex was completed in 1897, it was the largest and costliest library in the entire world.

Library of Congress Opens to the Public

On November 1, 1897, America’s Library of Congress opened its doors.

James Madison was reportedly the first person to suggest the establishment of a congressional library in 1783. The library was officially created 17 years later by President John Adams. The legislation set aside $5,000 for the purchase of books that Congress would find useful. The first collection was housed in the U.S. Capitol Building and consisted of 740 books and three maps. Two years later, when Thomas Jefferson was President, he appointed the first overseer of the library as well as a committee to regulate it.

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This Day in History… October 31, 1940

Item #M11154 – The Battle of Britain was the first battle to be fought entirely in the air and the longest aerial bombing campaign in history.

Battle of Britain Ends

On October 31, 1940, the nearly four-month-long Battle of Britain came to an end.

By the summer of 1940, the German Army had pushed the Allied forces to the coast of France, and England was the next target. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill refused to consider a peace agreement with Germany, and Britain braced for an attack. In the words of Churchill, “The Battle of France is over, the Battle of Britain is about to begin.”

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This Day in History… October 30, 1974

Item #M9118 – Ali was dubbed “The Greatest,” “The People’s Champion,” and “The Louisville Lip.”

Ali Wins the “Rumble in the Jungle”

On October 30, 1974, Muhammad Ali faced off against heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman in the “Rumble in the Jungle.”

Muhammad Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., on January 17, 1942. He started boxing when he was 12 years old and became a talented fighter, winning six Kentucky Golden Glove titles, two national Golden Glove titles, and a gold medal in the 1960 Olympics, all before turning professional.

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This Day in History… October 29, 1863

U.S. #1016 was the first bi-colored U.S. postage stamp ever produced on the rotary press.

International Red Cross Establishes Goals

On October 29, 1863, representatives from around the world joined together to establish the International Red Cross.

While on a business trip to Italy in 1859, Swiss humanitarian Jean Henri Dunant witnessed the aftermath of the Battle of Solferino (part of the Austro-Sardinian War) in which nearly 40,000 soldiers were killed or wounded. Shocked by the lack of medical care, Dunant put his business aside and began tending to the wounded. He convinced locals to help without discrimination.

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