This Day in History… May 2, 1863

Stonewall Jackson Mortally Wounded 

U.S. #2975s – Jackson spent more time in the U.S. Army than the Confederacy, but is still one of the South’s most loved sons.

On May 2, 1863, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was mortally wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville.

The man considered to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in the nation’s history began life humbly. His great-grandparents arrived in America on a prison ship, indentured for committing larceny in London.

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Posted in May 2016, This Day in History | 13 Comments

This Day in History… May 1, 1840

World’s First Postage Stamp Issued 

Item #Black1 – a closely trimmed Penny Black.

The world’s first postage stamp, the Penny Black, was issued on May 1, 1840.

Sir Rowland Hill, a man credited with inventing the postage stamp, was born on December 3, 1795, in Kidderminster, England. By 1807, young Roland was already a student teacher at the same school where his father taught. Twelve years later, in 1819, Roland founded the Hazlewood School, in nearby Edgbaston. Hazlewood was unique, as it had a science laboratory, swimming pool, gymnasium, library, gas-powered lights and central heating – at a time when other schools were very poor.

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Posted in May 2016, This Day in History | 28 Comments

This Day in History… April 30, 1812

Louisiana Admitted to the Union

U.S. #1197 honors Louisiana’s 150th anniversary.

On April 30, 1812, Louisiana became America’s 18th State.

Although Indians lived in the lower Mississippi River valley as far back as 10,000 years ago, little evidence remains of their culture. The first organized society, called the Poverty Point site, may date as far back as 700 B.C.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 9 Comments

This Day in History… April 29, 1862

Capture of New Orleans

U.S. #4664 was issued for the 150th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans.

On April 29, 1862, Union Admiral David Farragut captured New Orleans from Confederate forces.

At the start of the Civil War, Winfield Scott, the Union’s Commander, devised a plan to divide the Confederacy and cut off trade by taking control of the Mississippi River. The capture of New Orleans – a thriving center of trade in the mid-1800s – was a step toward accomplishing both goals.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 5 Comments

This Day in History… April 28, 1758

Birth of James Monroe 

U.S. #591 – In 1820, Monroe was the third and final U.S. President to run unopposed in an election.

James Monroe was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on April 28, 1758, to successful Virginia plantation owners.

When Monroe was a teenager, both of his parents died, leaving him the family tobacco farm. After attending the Campbelltown Academy, Monroe enrolled in Virginia’s College of William and Mary at the age of 16.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 13 Comments

This Day in History… April 27, 1822

Happy Birthday Ulysses S. Grant 

U.S. #223 – From the 1890-93 Regular Issues.

Hiram Ulysses Grant was born on April 27, 1822, in Point Pleasant, Ohio. He was a small, sensitive, and quiet child, which earned him ridicule in school by children who confused his silence for stupidity, nicknaming him “Useless.”

From an early age, Grant displayed a high level of skill in horsemanship, and he was known throughout town for his talent at handling unruly horses. In 1839, Grant’s father heard of a vacancy at West Point. He asked Congressman Thomas L. Hamer to appoint his son to fill the spot. Grant was hesitant at first, but grew excited at the chance to travel and receive a better education.

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Posted in April 2016, This Day in History | 17 Comments