This Day in History… April 8, 1975

Voyageurs National Park

US #C148 from the Scenic American Landscapes Airmail Series.

On April 8, 1975, an Act of Congress officially established Voyageurs National Park.

Native Americans first began living in the Voyageurs National Park area around 10,000 years ago.  Later, people found the waterways as they followed animal and plant populations to where they were most plentiful. Today, there are 18 Native American tribes culturally related to Voyageurs National Park.  Those that have been in the area the longest are the Algonquian-speaking groups such as the Ojibwe, Cree, and Assiniboine.  The Ojibwe were the main occupants from the early 1700s on.

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This Day in History… April 7, 1740

Birth of Haym Salomon

US #1561 was the third stamp in the Contributors to the Cause Series, honoring some of the war’s lesser-known figures.

Haym Salomon was born on April 7, 1740, in Leszno, Poland. 

As a young man, Salomon traveled throughout Western Europe and learned a great deal about finance and other languages.  He returned home to Poland in 1770, and spent some time in England before immigrating to the US in 1775.

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This Day in History… April 6, 1869

The American Museum of Natural History

US #1387-90 were issued to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the museum’s opening.

On April 6, 1869, the American Museum of Natural History is established in New York City. 

The museum was largely the dream of naturalist Dr. Albert S. Bickmore.  For several years, Bickmore lobbied extensively for the creation of a natural history museum in New York. 

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This Day in History… April 5, 1761

Birth of Sybil Ludington

US #1559 – Ludington was honored as part of the Contributors to the Cause Bicentennial Series.

Revolutionary heroine Sybil Ludington was born on April 5, 1761 in Kent, New York.  

The oldest of 12 children, Sybil was the daughter of Colonel Henry Ludington, the leader of the local militia in Patterson, New York.  During the Revolutionary War, Sybil wanted to join the militia because she didn’t like being ruled by Great Britain.

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This Day in History… April 4, 1925

American Revolution Sesquicentennial

US #617 Washington at Cambridge

US #617
Washington at Cambridge

On April 4, 1925, the US Post Office issued the first three stamps in a multi-year series honoring important events and people from the American Revolution.  The stamps were issued for the sesquicentennial (150th) anniversary of the Revolution.

US #617 pictures General George Washington leading colonial forces at Cambridge Common on July 2, 1775.  This was two-and-a-half months after the battles at Lexington and Concord.  A driving factor for this scene’s inclusion in the set was due to the famed “Washington Elm.”  According to legend, Washington stood under the elm tree as he took command of the Continental Army.  Over the years, the tree was badly damaged and was accidentally knocked over during repair attempts in 1923. Continue reading

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This Day in History… April 3, 1898

Birth of Henry Luce

US #2935 was issued on Luce’s 100th birthday.

Magazine magnate Henry Robinson Luce was born on April 3, 1898, in Tengchow, Shandong, China.

Luce spent much of his childhood in China where his parents were Presbyterian missionaries.  He attended Chinese and English boarding schools until he was 15, at which point he was sent to the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut.

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