This Day in History… May 4, 1974

Opening of Expo ’74 

US #1527 was designed by legendary artist Peter Max.

On May 4, 1974, Expo ’74 opened in Spokane, Washington.

“Celebrating Tomorrow’s Fresh New Environment” was the slogan for the 1974 World’s Fair held in Spokane, Washington. It was the first world’s fair to focus on environmental themes instead of the space age and technological wonders.

Continue reading

Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 1 Comment

This Day in History… May 3, 1861

Winfield Scott’s “Anaconda Plan” 

US #153 from the 1870-71 National Bank Note Printing.

On May 3, 1861, General-in-Chief Winfield Scott presented a plan to end the Civil War without a great loss of life – it was later dubbed the “Anaconda Plan.”

At the beginning of the Civil War, many in Washington, DC, felt the Union would defeat the Confederacy in a short time. General Winfield Scott was a seasoned soldier and skilled strategist, so he knew the war would be drawn out.

Continue reading

Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 3 Comments

This Day in History… May 2, 1908

“Take Me Out to the Ball Game” 

US #4341 was issued for the song’s 100th anniversary in 2008.

On May 2, 1908, “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” was submitted to the US Copyright Office. Neither of the men involved in its creation had ever seen a baseball game.

Earlier in 1908, songwriter Jack Norworth was riding the subway in New York when he happened to glance out the window and find inspiration in a sign. It simply said, “Baseball Today – Polo Grounds.”

Continue reading

Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 2 Comments

This Day in History… May 1, 1929

Kansas-Nebraska Stamps 

US #658 was overprinted on US #552.

On May 1, 1929, the Kansas-Nebraska stamps were officially placed on sale.

During the 1920s, a rash of post office robberies baffled US postal inspectors. Burglars were stealing stamps in one state and then selling them in another. As the Post Office Department searched for a solution to put an end to the problem, the robberies became more frequent and more widespread, especially in the Midwest.

Continue reading

Posted in May 2018, This Day in History | 3 Comments

This Day in History… April 30, 1941

US Savings Bonds 

US #2534 was issued on this day in 1991.

On April 30, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt announced a new series of US Savings Bonds and bought the first one himself the following day.

The practice of the government selling securities to the public dates back to 1776. That year, private citizens bought more than $27 million in government bonds to help pay for the American Revolution. They put their trust in their new government that they would be repaid. And indeed, they were all repaid, and on time, proving the system worked and paving the way for a new American tradition.

Continue reading

Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 4 Comments

This Day in History… April 29, 1947

First US Aerogram

US #UC16 – America’s first aerogram, issued on this day in 1947.

On April 29, 1947, the US issued its first aerogram, then called an air letter sheet.

In the early days of the mail, letter sheets were the common way to send letters. Messages were written on paper that was folded and sealed. Some postal authorities would charge by the amount of paper used, so using an envelope would make mailing a letter more expensive. As these laws changed and envelopes became the common practice, letter sheets fell out of favor but were still used on occasion in the 1900s.

Continue reading

Posted in April 2018, This Day in History | 5 Comments