#1118 – 1958 8¢ Lajos Kossuth

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.50
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.20
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50750 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 34 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1-5/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
U.S. #1118
1958 8¢ Lajos Kossuth
Champions of Liberty

Issue Date: September 19, 1958
City:  Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 44,064,576
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations: 
11
Color:  Carmine, ultramarine, and ocher
 
Lajos Kossuth, a Hungarian revolutionary, is showcased on U.S. #1118. Kossuth fought tirelessly for independence for Hungary, and served briefly as Governor-President when the country earned its independence in 1849. But in 1851, the government collapsed as the area was taken over by Austria, and Lajos moved to America. U.S. #1118 was printed on the new Giori Press, in three colors. 
 
Kossuth continued to work for Hungary’s freedom while in America. He became the second foreign citizen to address the joint houses of Congress (Lafayette was the first). Kossuth was given a congressional banquet and received at the White House. His popularity was so great that it caused tensions between the United States and Austria, who wanted him given into their custody. 
 
Champions of Liberty
In 1957, the Post Office Department issued a stamp honoring Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay as a “Champion of Liberty.” Magsaysay’s stamp marked the beginning of a 10-stamp series honoring non-Americans who fought for freedom in their homelands. 
 
After Magsaysay’s single commemorative stamp was issued, the rest of the series had two stamps printed for each subject – one in a single color, and one with three colors. The pairs were also of different denominations. The series was issued from 1957 to 1961. It featured Ramon Magsaysay, Simón Bolívar, Lajos Kossuth, José de San Martín, Ernst Reuter, T.G. Masaryk, Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Gustaf Mannerheim, Giuseppe Garibaldi, and Mahatma Gandhi.
 
Giori Press Added Color
In 1955, the Post Office Department acquired a new stamp press designed by Gualtiero Giori. Called the “Giori Press,” the new machine could produce stamps in two or three different colors, all in one pass. Different rollers each applied a different color.
 
The new press began producing stamps in 1957, with U.S.# 1094, the American Flag. It soon was used on the Champions of Liberty stamps. In 1962, the press was used for a secret project – some speculated that it was making money.  Instead, the result was the “Project Mercury” stamp (U.S. #1193), printed in secret even among Post Office employees. 
 
The stamp was shipped in sealed packages to over 300 postmasters across the country, with strict instructions not to open it until instructed. The secrecy was dependent upon the success of John Glenn’s historic space flight orbiting Earth – if the mission had failed, the stamp would not have been released.
 
 
 
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #1118
1958 8¢ Lajos Kossuth
Champions of Liberty

Issue Date: September 19, 1958
City:  Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 44,064,576
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations: 
11
Color:  Carmine, ultramarine, and ocher
 
Lajos Kossuth, a Hungarian revolutionary, is showcased on U.S. #1118. Kossuth fought tirelessly for independence for Hungary, and served briefly as Governor-President when the country earned its independence in 1849. But in 1851, the government collapsed as the area was taken over by Austria, and Lajos moved to America. U.S. #1118 was printed on the new Giori Press, in three colors. 
 
Kossuth continued to work for Hungary’s freedom while in America. He became the second foreign citizen to address the joint houses of Congress (Lafayette was the first). Kossuth was given a congressional banquet and received at the White House. His popularity was so great that it caused tensions between the United States and Austria, who wanted him given into their custody. 
 
Champions of Liberty
In 1957, the Post Office Department issued a stamp honoring Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay as a “Champion of Liberty.” Magsaysay’s stamp marked the beginning of a 10-stamp series honoring non-Americans who fought for freedom in their homelands. 
 
After Magsaysay’s single commemorative stamp was issued, the rest of the series had two stamps printed for each subject – one in a single color, and one with three colors. The pairs were also of different denominations. The series was issued from 1957 to 1961. It featured Ramon Magsaysay, Simón Bolívar, Lajos Kossuth, José de San Martín, Ernst Reuter, T.G. Masaryk, Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Gustaf Mannerheim, Giuseppe Garibaldi, and Mahatma Gandhi.
 
Giori Press Added Color
In 1955, the Post Office Department acquired a new stamp press designed by Gualtiero Giori. Called the “Giori Press,” the new machine could produce stamps in two or three different colors, all in one pass. Different rollers each applied a different color.
 
The new press began producing stamps in 1957, with U.S.# 1094, the American Flag. It soon was used on the Champions of Liberty stamps. In 1962, the press was used for a secret project – some speculated that it was making money.  Instead, the result was the “Project Mercury” stamp (U.S. #1193), printed in secret even among Post Office employees. 
 
The stamp was shipped in sealed packages to over 300 postmasters across the country, with strict instructions not to open it until instructed. The secrecy was dependent upon the success of John Glenn’s historic space flight orbiting Earth – if the mission had failed, the stamp would not have been released.