#1167 – 1960 4c Camp Fire Girls

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- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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U.S. #1167
4¢ Camp Fire Girls
 
Issue Date: November 1, 1960
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 116,210,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori Press
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue and bright red
 
U.S. #1167 commemorates the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Camp Fire Girls. The stamp shows the organization’s insignia – burning logs inside a triangle.
 
Camp Fire Boys and Girls
Luther and Charlotte Gulick founded the Camp Fire Girls in 1910. Luther helped to form the Boy Scouts of America in 1910, and later received many letters requesting a similar opportunity for girls. The Gulicks had operated a family camp for 20 years and had organized one of the nation’s first girl’s camps, Camp Sebago-Wohelo, on the shores of Lake Sebago in Maine, in 1909. “Wohelo” was a word Charlotte invented from the first two letters of the words “work,” “health,” and “love.” 
 
The Gulicks were well known for their work, and the popularity of the Camp Fire Girls grew rapidly. In 1975, the organization began admitting boys and was renamed Camp Fire Boys and Girls. Today, more than 500,000 young people are involved with the Camp Fire organization.
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U.S. #1167
4¢ Camp Fire Girls
 
Issue Date: November 1, 1960
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 116,210,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori Press
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue and bright red
 
U.S. #1167 commemorates the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Camp Fire Girls. The stamp shows the organization’s insignia – burning logs inside a triangle.
 
Camp Fire Boys and Girls
Luther and Charlotte Gulick founded the Camp Fire Girls in 1910. Luther helped to form the Boy Scouts of America in 1910, and later received many letters requesting a similar opportunity for girls. The Gulicks had operated a family camp for 20 years and had organized one of the nation’s first girl’s camps, Camp Sebago-Wohelo, on the shores of Lake Sebago in Maine, in 1909. “Wohelo” was a word Charlotte invented from the first two letters of the words “work,” “health,” and “love.” 
 
The Gulicks were well known for their work, and the popularity of the Camp Fire Girls grew rapidly. In 1975, the organization began admitting boys and was renamed Camp Fire Boys and Girls. Today, more than 500,000 young people are involved with the Camp Fire organization.