#118-20 – 1869 Pictorial Issues, set of 3

Condition
Price
Qty
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-3 business days.i$885.00
$885.00
 

Own Three Sought-After 1869 Pictorials
First Bi-Color And First “Non-Portrait” U.S. Postage Stamps

When the Pictorial stamps were issued, they were considered radical.  They were the first US postage stamps to picture something other than the head or bust of a famous leader.  And on top of that, they included the world’s first bi-color postage stamps.  So, it’s easy to see why the Pictorials created quite a stir among stamp enthusiasts.  However, reactions to the stamps were mostly negative at the time.

 

It seems the people of the 1860s thought the Pictorial designs were frivolous or improper.  In fact, they were so unpopular that they were discontinued after only one year because of poor sales.  Yet today, they’re recognized as the forerunners of modern commemoratives.  They are among the most highly prized of all classic US stamps.

 

The Pictorials are the only stamps to feature the “G” grill.

Beginning in the 1860s, the government was concerned that customers were cleaning and reusing postage stamps.  Charles F. Steele invented a device that “grilled” stamps to prevent reuse.  This machine utilized a roller that was either pitted with small depressions or had raised pyramids.  When such rollers were run over paper, its fibers were broken, leaving a pattern.  The broken fibers allowed ink to sink thoroughly into the paper, making ink removal virtually impossible.

 

The Series of 1869 was printed by the National Bank Note Company.  This company was awarded the contract because it held the patent for the grilling process.  This made it the only choice available to the Post Office Department.

 

Different shapes or patterns of grills were used during stamp production.  Studying grills is an interesting part of our hobby.  The various grills used on US postage stamps are identified by letter names.  All the 1869 Pictorials feature the “G” grill – they are the only stamps to do so. 

 

Can you tell the difference between U.S. #118 & 119?

US #118 and #119 look very similar, but there are major differences between them...

 

US #118 (Type I) has a single line framing the vignette.  It was sold for less than two months because misalignments between the frame and vignette were noticeable.  Only 120,000 Type I stamps were distributed before they were replaced by US #119.

 

Postal officials decided to add extra bands of lines around the inside of the frame surrounding the vignette to make any slight misalignment less noticeable.  A “diamond” ornament was placed at the top center of that frame, just below the “T” in postage.  This newly engraved stamp, US #119, is referred to as a “Type II.”

 

Can you spot all 42 patriots in U.S. #120’s engraving?

The 1869 Declaration of Independence Pictorial stamp is based on John Trumbull’s large painting of the presentation of the Declaration to the Second Continental Congress.  It pictures 42 of the men who signed the document.  The painting was reduced 300 times for the stamp’s vignette.  It was engraved by James Smillie and is considered one of the finest examples of the engraver’s art.  Look closely and you’ll see 42 distinct figures on this tiny stamp.  Six of the Founding Fathers can be identified with the help of a magnifying glass – even though their faces are smaller than the head of a pin!

 

This is a fantastic opportunity to own US #118, 119, and 120.  Order today.

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Own Three Sought-After 1869 Pictorials
First Bi-Color And First “Non-Portrait” U.S. Postage Stamps

When the Pictorial stamps were issued, they were considered radical.  They were the first US postage stamps to picture something other than the head or bust of a famous leader.  And on top of that, they included the world’s first bi-color postage stamps.  So, it’s easy to see why the Pictorials created quite a stir among stamp enthusiasts.  However, reactions to the stamps were mostly negative at the time.

 

It seems the people of the 1860s thought the Pictorial designs were frivolous or improper.  In fact, they were so unpopular that they were discontinued after only one year because of poor sales.  Yet today, they’re recognized as the forerunners of modern commemoratives.  They are among the most highly prized of all classic US stamps.

 

The Pictorials are the only stamps to feature the “G” grill.

Beginning in the 1860s, the government was concerned that customers were cleaning and reusing postage stamps.  Charles F. Steele invented a device that “grilled” stamps to prevent reuse.  This machine utilized a roller that was either pitted with small depressions or had raised pyramids.  When such rollers were run over paper, its fibers were broken, leaving a pattern.  The broken fibers allowed ink to sink thoroughly into the paper, making ink removal virtually impossible.

 

The Series of 1869 was printed by the National Bank Note Company.  This company was awarded the contract because it held the patent for the grilling process.  This made it the only choice available to the Post Office Department.

 

Different shapes or patterns of grills were used during stamp production.  Studying grills is an interesting part of our hobby.  The various grills used on US postage stamps are identified by letter names.  All the 1869 Pictorials feature the “G” grill – they are the only stamps to do so. 

 

Can you tell the difference between U.S. #118 & 119?

US #118 and #119 look very similar, but there are major differences between them...

 

US #118 (Type I) has a single line framing the vignette.  It was sold for less than two months because misalignments between the frame and vignette were noticeable.  Only 120,000 Type I stamps were distributed before they were replaced by US #119.

 

Postal officials decided to add extra bands of lines around the inside of the frame surrounding the vignette to make any slight misalignment less noticeable.  A “diamond” ornament was placed at the top center of that frame, just below the “T” in postage.  This newly engraved stamp, US #119, is referred to as a “Type II.”

 

Can you spot all 42 patriots in U.S. #120’s engraving?

The 1869 Declaration of Independence Pictorial stamp is based on John Trumbull’s large painting of the presentation of the Declaration to the Second Continental Congress.  It pictures 42 of the men who signed the document.  The painting was reduced 300 times for the stamp’s vignette.  It was engraved by James Smillie and is considered one of the finest examples of the engraver’s art.  Look closely and you’ll see 42 distinct figures on this tiny stamp.  Six of the Founding Fathers can be identified with the help of a magnifying glass – even though their faces are smaller than the head of a pin!

 

This is a fantastic opportunity to own US #118, 119, and 120.  Order today.