#1668 – 1976 13c State Flags: Nevada

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U.S. #1668
1976 13¢ Nevada
State Flags Issue
 
 
Issue Date: February 23, 1976
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 8,720,100 panes of 50
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Issued as part of the ongoing Bicentennial celebration, the 13¢ State Flags pane was a first in U.S. history. This was the first time a pane with 50 face-different stamps was issued. Each state is represented by its official flag, with the stamps arranged on the sheet in the same order each state was admitted into the Union.
 

Nevada Becomes 36th State

U.S. #999 was issued for the 100th anniversary of Nevada’s first settlement, Carson Valley.

On October 31, 1864, Abraham Lincoln admitted Nevada to the Union to aid in the Civil War.

American Indians may have lived in the Nevada region more than 20,000 years ago, making this area home to some of the earliest Indians in the United States. In southern Nevada, Indians left picture writing on rocks that date back thousands of years. Nevada tribes include the Pueblo, Mohave, Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe.

Historians believe Francisco Garcés was the first white man to reach Nevada. In 1776, Garcés went through the region while traveling from New Mexico to California. Between 1825 and 1830, many fur trappers came to Nevada. William Wolfskill blazed the Old Spanish Trail from Santa Fe to Los Angeles. This route made it possible for people in Nevada to trade with the southeast.

U.S. #1248 was issued for Nevada’s 100th anniversary and pictures Virginia City.

A trapper, Joseph Walker, blazed an important trail along the Humboldt River from Nevada to California in 1833. When gold was discovered in 1848, thousands of people followed this trail west to stake a claim. From 1843 to 1845, Lieutenant John C. Frémont mapped Nevada with Kit Carson as his guide.

The United States acquired Nevada from Mexico at the end of the Mexican War in 1848. It was governed as part of a vast territory that included California, Utah, and parts of four other states. The Mormon leader Brigham Young organized the State of Deseret in 1849. Deseret included Utah, most of Nevada, and parts of other U.S. states. Young asked the federal government to admit Deseret to the Union. Instead, in 1850, Congress created the Utah Territory, which included Utah and most of Nevada, and named Young governor.

Starting in 1851, large numbers of Mormons began moving to the Carson Valley in Nevada. They established a trading post called Mormon Station for people traveling west to California to find gold. Mormon Station later became Genoa, the oldest permanent white settlement in Utah.

U.S. #1668 – The Nevada flag includes a silver star, the phrase “Battle Born,” and the state flower, green sagebrush.

Carson Valley was organized as Carson County. However, non-Mormon citizens of Carson County did not want to be governed by Young. They petitioned Congress to make Carson County part of California. In 1857, Young asked Mormons in the area to move to Great Salt Lake due to fear of an attack by the federal government. Two years later, non-Mormons organized a separate government for Carson County and attempted to establish it as a distinct territory. However, the federal government refused to recognize the territory, due to its extremely limited population.

In 1859, a rich deposit of silver ore was discovered at the present site of Virginia City. Although other miners had discovered the silver, Henry Comstock took credit for finding the ore. Thus, this deposit became known as the Comstock Lode.

U.S. #3588 contrasts Nevada’s desert plants and hills against the famed neon cowboy in Las Vegas.

News of the discovery spread fast, and soon miners from California and the Eastern U.S. flocked to the area looking to strike it rich. Virginia City quickly became a thriving mining center.

The miners didn’t have an easy life. Provisions had to be shipped from California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and were very expensive. Although some miners became millionaires, others found little or no wealth. Many of the miners were criminals, and lawlessness made the mining camps a dangerous place to live. Nevertheless, by 1860, Carson County’s mining camps held more than 6,700 people.

On March 2, 1861, President James Buchanan created the Nevada Territory. Two days later, President Abraham Lincoln took office. Lincoln named New York politician James W. Nye the territory’s first governor. The Civil War erupted before the territorial government could be established. Nevada’s rich silver resources gained importance during the war, as both sides needed wealth to pay for the expense of waging battle.

U.S. #4306 pictures the Nevada flag with an ocotillo plant.

Most Nevadans favored the Northern cause. Lincoln was anxious to admit another state to the Union so that he would be able to pass his proposed slavery amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Despite the fact that Nevada did not have the required number of people to become a state, Nevadans held a convention to create a state constitution. The first convention, held in November 1863, met with failure. The second convention, held in July 1864, was a success. There was a rush to grant the territory statehood in order to help Lincoln’s re-election bid in 1864. To that end, the entire state constitution was sent to Washington, D.C., by telegraph.  It was a process that took more than seven hours to transmit. Statehood was gained just eight days before the election, on October 31, 1864, with the Civil War still raging. This led to Nevada’s nickname “Battle Born,” which is featured on the state flag.

From 1870 until 1900, Nevada entered a period of economic decline. Silver mining became less profitable, and many mines closed. Cattle ranchers suffered, due to the high cost of shipping their livestock by rail. Between 1880 and 1890, the state’s population dropped from 62,266 to 47,355.

Around 1900, new mineral resources were discovered, and the economic tide turned. Silver was discovered at Tonopah. Cooper was found at Ely, Ruth, and Mountain City. Gold was discovered at Goldfield in 1902. Miners returned to the state in large numbers.

Railroads built new lines. This improved rail service also benefitted the ranchers. Dams and irrigation projects on the Carson and Truckee rivers improved the state’s infrastructure. By 1917, when the U.S. entered World War I, the state’s silver and gold mines were nearly exhausted. But the war created demand for the mining of copper, tungsten, zinc, and other metals.

U.S. #4907 pictures an oil painting of Fire Canyon at dawn.

In 1928, the U.S. Congress authorized the construction of the gigantic Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. Completed in 1936, this dam is a source of power and also stores irrigation water for Nevada, Arizona, and California.

Tourism, fueled by gambling, is Nevada’s largest and fastest-growing industry. As early as the 1960s, Las Vegas alone attracted 15 million tourists each year. Because of this tourist industry, Nevada has become a “two-city” state, as four-fifths of the people live in the Las Vegas and Reno-Lake Tahoe areas. These city areas face many of the same problems facing metropolitan areas across the U.S., including: demand for better police and fire protection, improved educational facilities, better opportunities for minorities, and control of air and water pollution.

 
Nevada State Flag
The politics of the Civil War weighed heavily in Nevada achieving statehood. There was a rush to grant the territory statehood in order to help President Abraham Lincoln’s re-election bid in 1864. To that end, the entire state constitution was sent by telegraph to Washington, D.C. It was a process that took more than seven hours to transmit. Statehood was gained just eight days before the election, with the Civil War still raging. This led to Nevada’s nickname “Battle Born,” which is featured on the state flag.
 
Nevada means “snow-covered” in Spanish. But Nevada is a land of contrasts. Most of the state is desert, and almost the entire state lies within the Great Basin desert. The desert is broken by mountain ranges, such as the Sierra Nevada along the western border with California. With 172 mountains at 2,000 feet or more high, Nevada is the most mountainous of the lower 48 states.
 
Nevada is rich in mineral resources, particularly silver. Discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1857 marked the beginning of large-scale silver mining in America, as settlers rushed to the region to find riches. The industry has made Nevada the second-largest silver-producing state in America, inspiring another nickname – the “Silver State.”
 
The Bicentennial Series
The U.S. Bicentennial was a series of celebrations during the mid-1970s that commemorated the historic events leading to America’s independence from Great Britain. The official events began on April 1, 1975, when the American Freedom Train departed Delaware to begin a 21-month, 25,338-mile tour of the 48 contiguous states. For more than a year, a wave of patriotism swept the nation as elaborate firework displays lit up skies across the U.S., an international fleet of tall-mast sailing ships gathered in New York City and Boston, and Queen Elizabeth made a state visit. The celebration culminated on July 4, 1976, with the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. 
 
The U.S.P.S. issued 113 commemorative stamps over a six-year period in honor of the U.S. bicentennial, beginning with the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission Emblem stamp (U.S. #1432). As a group, the Bicentennial Series chronicles one of our nation’s most important chapters, and remembers the events and patriots who made the U.S. a world model for liberty.
 
 
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U.S. #1668
1976 13¢ Nevada
State Flags Issue
 
 
Issue Date: February 23, 1976
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 8,720,100 panes of 50
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Issued as part of the ongoing Bicentennial celebration, the 13¢ State Flags pane was a first in U.S. history. This was the first time a pane with 50 face-different stamps was issued. Each state is represented by its official flag, with the stamps arranged on the sheet in the same order each state was admitted into the Union.
 

Nevada Becomes 36th State

U.S. #999 was issued for the 100th anniversary of Nevada’s first settlement, Carson Valley.

On October 31, 1864, Abraham Lincoln admitted Nevada to the Union to aid in the Civil War.

American Indians may have lived in the Nevada region more than 20,000 years ago, making this area home to some of the earliest Indians in the United States. In southern Nevada, Indians left picture writing on rocks that date back thousands of years. Nevada tribes include the Pueblo, Mohave, Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe.

Historians believe Francisco Garcés was the first white man to reach Nevada. In 1776, Garcés went through the region while traveling from New Mexico to California. Between 1825 and 1830, many fur trappers came to Nevada. William Wolfskill blazed the Old Spanish Trail from Santa Fe to Los Angeles. This route made it possible for people in Nevada to trade with the southeast.

U.S. #1248 was issued for Nevada’s 100th anniversary and pictures Virginia City.

A trapper, Joseph Walker, blazed an important trail along the Humboldt River from Nevada to California in 1833. When gold was discovered in 1848, thousands of people followed this trail west to stake a claim. From 1843 to 1845, Lieutenant John C. Frémont mapped Nevada with Kit Carson as his guide.

The United States acquired Nevada from Mexico at the end of the Mexican War in 1848. It was governed as part of a vast territory that included California, Utah, and parts of four other states. The Mormon leader Brigham Young organized the State of Deseret in 1849. Deseret included Utah, most of Nevada, and parts of other U.S. states. Young asked the federal government to admit Deseret to the Union. Instead, in 1850, Congress created the Utah Territory, which included Utah and most of Nevada, and named Young governor.

Starting in 1851, large numbers of Mormons began moving to the Carson Valley in Nevada. They established a trading post called Mormon Station for people traveling west to California to find gold. Mormon Station later became Genoa, the oldest permanent white settlement in Utah.

U.S. #1668 – The Nevada flag includes a silver star, the phrase “Battle Born,” and the state flower, green sagebrush.

Carson Valley was organized as Carson County. However, non-Mormon citizens of Carson County did not want to be governed by Young. They petitioned Congress to make Carson County part of California. In 1857, Young asked Mormons in the area to move to Great Salt Lake due to fear of an attack by the federal government. Two years later, non-Mormons organized a separate government for Carson County and attempted to establish it as a distinct territory. However, the federal government refused to recognize the territory, due to its extremely limited population.

In 1859, a rich deposit of silver ore was discovered at the present site of Virginia City. Although other miners had discovered the silver, Henry Comstock took credit for finding the ore. Thus, this deposit became known as the Comstock Lode.

U.S. #3588 contrasts Nevada’s desert plants and hills against the famed neon cowboy in Las Vegas.

News of the discovery spread fast, and soon miners from California and the Eastern U.S. flocked to the area looking to strike it rich. Virginia City quickly became a thriving mining center.

The miners didn’t have an easy life. Provisions had to be shipped from California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and were very expensive. Although some miners became millionaires, others found little or no wealth. Many of the miners were criminals, and lawlessness made the mining camps a dangerous place to live. Nevertheless, by 1860, Carson County’s mining camps held more than 6,700 people.

On March 2, 1861, President James Buchanan created the Nevada Territory. Two days later, President Abraham Lincoln took office. Lincoln named New York politician James W. Nye the territory’s first governor. The Civil War erupted before the territorial government could be established. Nevada’s rich silver resources gained importance during the war, as both sides needed wealth to pay for the expense of waging battle.

U.S. #4306 pictures the Nevada flag with an ocotillo plant.

Most Nevadans favored the Northern cause. Lincoln was anxious to admit another state to the Union so that he would be able to pass his proposed slavery amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Despite the fact that Nevada did not have the required number of people to become a state, Nevadans held a convention to create a state constitution. The first convention, held in November 1863, met with failure. The second convention, held in July 1864, was a success. There was a rush to grant the territory statehood in order to help Lincoln’s re-election bid in 1864. To that end, the entire state constitution was sent to Washington, D.C., by telegraph.  It was a process that took more than seven hours to transmit. Statehood was gained just eight days before the election, on October 31, 1864, with the Civil War still raging. This led to Nevada’s nickname “Battle Born,” which is featured on the state flag.

From 1870 until 1900, Nevada entered a period of economic decline. Silver mining became less profitable, and many mines closed. Cattle ranchers suffered, due to the high cost of shipping their livestock by rail. Between 1880 and 1890, the state’s population dropped from 62,266 to 47,355.

Around 1900, new mineral resources were discovered, and the economic tide turned. Silver was discovered at Tonopah. Cooper was found at Ely, Ruth, and Mountain City. Gold was discovered at Goldfield in 1902. Miners returned to the state in large numbers.

Railroads built new lines. This improved rail service also benefitted the ranchers. Dams and irrigation projects on the Carson and Truckee rivers improved the state’s infrastructure. By 1917, when the U.S. entered World War I, the state’s silver and gold mines were nearly exhausted. But the war created demand for the mining of copper, tungsten, zinc, and other metals.

U.S. #4907 pictures an oil painting of Fire Canyon at dawn.

In 1928, the U.S. Congress authorized the construction of the gigantic Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. Completed in 1936, this dam is a source of power and also stores irrigation water for Nevada, Arizona, and California.

Tourism, fueled by gambling, is Nevada’s largest and fastest-growing industry. As early as the 1960s, Las Vegas alone attracted 15 million tourists each year. Because of this tourist industry, Nevada has become a “two-city” state, as four-fifths of the people live in the Las Vegas and Reno-Lake Tahoe areas. These city areas face many of the same problems facing metropolitan areas across the U.S., including: demand for better police and fire protection, improved educational facilities, better opportunities for minorities, and control of air and water pollution.

 
Nevada State Flag
The politics of the Civil War weighed heavily in Nevada achieving statehood. There was a rush to grant the territory statehood in order to help President Abraham Lincoln’s re-election bid in 1864. To that end, the entire state constitution was sent by telegraph to Washington, D.C. It was a process that took more than seven hours to transmit. Statehood was gained just eight days before the election, with the Civil War still raging. This led to Nevada’s nickname “Battle Born,” which is featured on the state flag.
 
Nevada means “snow-covered” in Spanish. But Nevada is a land of contrasts. Most of the state is desert, and almost the entire state lies within the Great Basin desert. The desert is broken by mountain ranges, such as the Sierra Nevada along the western border with California. With 172 mountains at 2,000 feet or more high, Nevada is the most mountainous of the lower 48 states.
 
Nevada is rich in mineral resources, particularly silver. Discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1857 marked the beginning of large-scale silver mining in America, as settlers rushed to the region to find riches. The industry has made Nevada the second-largest silver-producing state in America, inspiring another nickname – the “Silver State.”
 
The Bicentennial Series
The U.S. Bicentennial was a series of celebrations during the mid-1970s that commemorated the historic events leading to America’s independence from Great Britain. The official events began on April 1, 1975, when the American Freedom Train departed Delaware to begin a 21-month, 25,338-mile tour of the 48 contiguous states. For more than a year, a wave of patriotism swept the nation as elaborate firework displays lit up skies across the U.S., an international fleet of tall-mast sailing ships gathered in New York City and Boston, and Queen Elizabeth made a state visit. The celebration culminated on July 4, 1976, with the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. 
 
The U.S.P.S. issued 113 commemorative stamps over a six-year period in honor of the U.S. bicentennial, beginning with the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission Emblem stamp (U.S. #1432). As a group, the Bicentennial Series chronicles one of our nation’s most important chapters, and remembers the events and patriots who made the U.S. a world model for liberty.