#1898 – 1983 3c Handcar 1880's, Coil

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 U.S. #1898
1983 3¢ Handcar
Transportation Series

Issue Date: March 25, 1983
City: Rochester, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 10 vertically
Color: Dark green
The small, manually operated handcar was extremely important to the early railroads. One or two men pushed the teeter-totter bar up and down, activating the gears, and propelling the cart along at a 10-mph pace. Not only did it carry men and supplies needed by workers and repair crews, but it was also used by safety inspectors.
The Transportation Series
A ground-breaking stamp was quietly issued on May 18, 1981. For the first time in U.S. history, a coil stamp featured its own unique design rather than simply copying that of the current definitive stamp. Fifty more coil stamps would be issued over the course of the next 15 years, each picturing a different mode of transportation. 
 
The various denominations provided face values to exactly match the rates for several categories of Third Class mail (bulk rate and quantity-discounted mail). As the rates changed, new stamps with new values were added. Never before had a stamp series included so many fractional cent values.
 
Most of the stamps in the Transportation Series were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, although a few were printed by private contractors. All but a few of the later stamps were produced by engraved intaglio. Differences in precancels, tagging, paper and gum provide a large number of varieties.
 
 
 
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 U.S. #1898
1983 3¢ Handcar
Transportation Series

Issue Date: March 25, 1983
City: Rochester, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 10 vertically
Color: Dark green

The small, manually operated handcar was extremely important to the early railroads. One or two men pushed the teeter-totter bar up and down, activating the gears, and propelling the cart along at a 10-mph pace. Not only did it carry men and supplies needed by workers and repair crews, but it was also used by safety inspectors.

The Transportation Series
A ground-breaking stamp was quietly issued on May 18, 1981. For the first time in U.S. history, a coil stamp featured its own unique design rather than simply copying that of the current definitive stamp. Fifty more coil stamps would be issued over the course of the next 15 years, each picturing a different mode of transportation. 
 
The various denominations provided face values to exactly match the rates for several categories of Third Class mail (bulk rate and quantity-discounted mail). As the rates changed, new stamps with new values were added. Never before had a stamp series included so many fractional cent values.
 
Most of the stamps in the Transportation Series were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, although a few were printed by private contractors. All but a few of the later stamps were produced by engraved intaglio. Differences in precancels, tagging, paper and gum provide a large number of varieties.