#2475 – 1990 25c Plastic Flag

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.50
$1.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.25
$1.25
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Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM212849x32mm 20 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.25
$3.25
U.S. #2475
25¢ Plastic Flag
 
Issue Date: May 18, 1990
City: Seattle, WA
Quantity: 3,014,000
Printed By: Avery International Group
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Die cut
Color: Dark red and dark blue
 
On May 18, 1990, the United States Postal Service began a six-month marketing test to sell stamps through Automated Teller Machines (ATMs). For this test, the USPS developed a stamp that was radically different from any it had previously issued. To meet the strict engineering requirements of ATMs, the stamps were made of a specially formulated polyester film. The panes of 12, which were the same size and shape as a dollar bill, were dispensed from the ATMs just like cash. In addition to offering customers the convenience of round-the-clock access to stamps, the ATM issues also offered the ease of peel-and-stick application with no licking or tearing.
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U.S. #2475
25¢ Plastic Flag
 
Issue Date: May 18, 1990
City: Seattle, WA
Quantity: 3,014,000
Printed By: Avery International Group
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Die cut
Color: Dark red and dark blue
 
On May 18, 1990, the United States Postal Service began a six-month marketing test to sell stamps through Automated Teller Machines (ATMs). For this test, the USPS developed a stamp that was radically different from any it had previously issued. To meet the strict engineering requirements of ATMs, the stamps were made of a specially formulated polyester film. The panes of 12, which were the same size and shape as a dollar bill, were dispensed from the ATMs just like cash. In addition to offering customers the convenience of round-the-clock access to stamps, the ATM issues also offered the ease of peel-and-stick application with no licking or tearing.