#3-4 – Complete Set of 2, 1875 10c Washington & 5c Franklin

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Usually ships within 30 days.i$2,495.00
$2,495.00
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM76830x32mm 25 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.25
$3.25

Own Authentic Reproductions of America's First Stamps…

Scarce * Mint Fresh * Affordable

Historic Acquisitions at a Fraction of the Price!

 
It's a privilege for me to be able to offer you the extremely scarce US #3 and #4.
 
With over 50 years in our hobby, I've rarely held them in my hand.  But now you can own these official reproductions of our nation's very first postage stamps.  At only $2495 for the pair, that's thousands of dollars less than our price for the original #1 and #2.  (And I've taken $195 savings off Mystic's regular price for #3 and #4).
 
Just think of all the other great stamps you can purchase for your collection with these big savings!
 
 
Very Fresh Condition and Hard to Tell From the Originals
 
It’s hard to believe how beautifully preserved these stamps are after all these years.  That such fragile pieces of history even survived for a century and a half is a miracle.  And yet they look so fresh and vibrant.   Like the originals, #3 and #4 were beautifully engraved with Old World artistry.  And even though printed from different plates, they’re so close to our first stamps, it’s amazing.
 
Here’s why these important stamps were issued…
 
 
Created for the 1876 Centennial Exhibition by Order of the U.S. Post Office Department
 
The U.S. Post Office goal was to display and sell every U.S. stamp at the upcoming Centennial Exhibition – America’s first official world’s fair.  However, there were no US #1s or #2s to be found.  They’d been demonetized in 1851, and the remainders destroyed, nearly 25 years earlier.  Even the printing plates had disappeared, likely destroyed.  What to do – create new plates and print new #1s and #2s, of course!
 
The Post Office Department ordered the new stamps from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.   They would be the very first ever produced by the Bureau.   So in addition to being replacements for America’s first stamps, #3 and #4 represent yet another historic philatelic first.
 
 
We Have Only Two Sets Available So Order Now
 
The #3 and #4 weren’t valid for postage, and sold just 4,779 and 3,883 respectively.  The rest were destroyed.  Who knows how many are out there for collectors now?  One thing’s for sure – not enough.  They’re so scarce we don’t even list them in Mystic’s U.S. Stamp Catalog.
 
Even with over 50 years’ experience as a stamp collector and dealer, I’ve rarely come across these stamps.  And with only two sets available, they won’t be around long.  So… if you want to be one of the few to have #3 and #4 in your collection… call us today and claim yours.  Before someone else does!
 
 
Top Nine Reasons Why You Should Add Scarce #3 and #4 to Your Collection:
 
  1. It’s like owning America’s First Stamps without the cost.
  2. Great price – only $2,495.  Saves you thousands off Mystic’s price for U.S. #1 and #2.  (Even includes a savings of $195 off our regular price for #3 and #4!) 
  3. Extremely scarce.  Stamps we’ve rarely ever seen at Mystic.   
  4. Low issue quantity and only a few thousand of each sold – the rest destroyed.  That means there aren’t nearly enough out there for collectors.  And that means you’ll be one of the lucky few.  
  5. Fresh mint condition.  Vibrant color and clear impression even after 145 years. 
  6. Neat story – part of US and philatelic history… history you hold in your hands.  
  7. First Issues of the Bureau of Printing and Engraving.
  8. Beautifully engraved with Old World precision… from the classic period of US stamps.   
  9. Close in appearance to the originals.  (We’ll tell you how to tell the difference below!)
 
 
Alert collectors (like us!) found small differences between #3 and #4 and the 1847 #1 and #2 originals. That's why Scott Catalogue gave them their own numbers.
 
Here’s how to tell the difference:
 
 
#3 – 5¢ 1875 Benjamin Franklin vs 1847 #1
 
  1. #3 was issued without gum; #1 was gummed.
  2. The original printers’ initials (R, W, H and E for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch, and Edson), which you’ll find below the “C” of “CENTS”, are narrower and less clear on #3 than on #1.  
  3. On #3, the left-most tip of the white lace frill on Franklin’s shirt touches the oval level with the top left corner of the number “5”.  On #1, the tip of the lace touches the oval level with the top left corner of the “F” in FIVE”.
  4. The line forming the right-hand side of the “N” in “CENTS” is pointed on the bottom on #3, instead of slightly squared off, as it is on #1.  
 
 
  
 
#4 – 10¢ 1875 George Washington vs. 1847 #2
 
  1. #4 was issued without gum; #2 was gummed.
  2. The original printers’ initials (R, W, H and E for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch, and Edson), which you’ll find below the “C” of “CENTS”, are narrower and less clear on #4 than on #2.  
  3. The placement of the edges of Washington’s coat differs between the #4 and the #2.  On #4, the left vertical edge touches the oval at the right-hand tip of the X.  The right vertical edge touches it at the center of the “S” in “CENTS”.  On #2, the left edge touches the oval at the center of the “T” in “TEN” and on the right, it touches between the “T” and “S” of “CENTS”.  
  4. Washington’s eyes have a slightly sleepy appearance on #4, and his mouth forms a straight line.  On #2 he looks more alert with an upward curve to his mouth. 
  5. The line forming the right-hand side of the “N” in “CENTS” at the bottom is pointed on #4, instead of slightly squared off, as it is on #2. 
 
 
 
 
Now you know how to tell the differences between these rare stamps.  Get set to dazzle your fellow collectors with your knowledge!
 
 
Read More - Click Here


Own Authentic Reproductions of America's First Stamps…

Scarce * Mint Fresh * Affordable

Historic Acquisitions at a Fraction of the Price!

 
It's a privilege for me to be able to offer you the extremely scarce US #3 and #4.
 
With over 50 years in our hobby, I've rarely held them in my hand.  But now you can own these official reproductions of our nation's very first postage stamps.  At only $2495 for the pair, that's thousands of dollars less than our price for the original #1 and #2.  (And I've taken $195 savings off Mystic's regular price for #3 and #4).
 
Just think of all the other great stamps you can purchase for your collection with these big savings!
 
 
Very Fresh Condition and Hard to Tell From the Originals
 
It’s hard to believe how beautifully preserved these stamps are after all these years.  That such fragile pieces of history even survived for a century and a half is a miracle.  And yet they look so fresh and vibrant.   Like the originals, #3 and #4 were beautifully engraved with Old World artistry.  And even though printed from different plates, they’re so close to our first stamps, it’s amazing.
 
Here’s why these important stamps were issued…
 
 
Created for the 1876 Centennial Exhibition by Order of the U.S. Post Office Department
 
The U.S. Post Office goal was to display and sell every U.S. stamp at the upcoming Centennial Exhibition – America’s first official world’s fair.  However, there were no US #1s or #2s to be found.  They’d been demonetized in 1851, and the remainders destroyed, nearly 25 years earlier.  Even the printing plates had disappeared, likely destroyed.  What to do – create new plates and print new #1s and #2s, of course!
 
The Post Office Department ordered the new stamps from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.   They would be the very first ever produced by the Bureau.   So in addition to being replacements for America’s first stamps, #3 and #4 represent yet another historic philatelic first.
 
 
We Have Only Two Sets Available So Order Now
 
The #3 and #4 weren’t valid for postage, and sold just 4,779 and 3,883 respectively.  The rest were destroyed.  Who knows how many are out there for collectors now?  One thing’s for sure – not enough.  They’re so scarce we don’t even list them in Mystic’s U.S. Stamp Catalog.
 
Even with over 50 years’ experience as a stamp collector and dealer, I’ve rarely come across these stamps.  And with only two sets available, they won’t be around long.  So… if you want to be one of the few to have #3 and #4 in your collection… call us today and claim yours.  Before someone else does!
 
 
Top Nine Reasons Why You Should Add Scarce #3 and #4 to Your Collection:
 
  1. It’s like owning America’s First Stamps without the cost.
  2. Great price – only $2,495.  Saves you thousands off Mystic’s price for U.S. #1 and #2.  (Even includes a savings of $195 off our regular price for #3 and #4!) 
  3. Extremely scarce.  Stamps we’ve rarely ever seen at Mystic.   
  4. Low issue quantity and only a few thousand of each sold – the rest destroyed.  That means there aren’t nearly enough out there for collectors.  And that means you’ll be one of the lucky few.  
  5. Fresh mint condition.  Vibrant color and clear impression even after 145 years. 
  6. Neat story – part of US and philatelic history… history you hold in your hands.  
  7. First Issues of the Bureau of Printing and Engraving.
  8. Beautifully engraved with Old World precision… from the classic period of US stamps.   
  9. Close in appearance to the originals.  (We’ll tell you how to tell the difference below!)
 
 
Alert collectors (like us!) found small differences between #3 and #4 and the 1847 #1 and #2 originals. That's why Scott Catalogue gave them their own numbers.
 
Here’s how to tell the difference:
 
 
#3 – 5¢ 1875 Benjamin Franklin vs 1847 #1
 
  1. #3 was issued without gum; #1 was gummed.
  2. The original printers’ initials (R, W, H and E for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch, and Edson), which you’ll find below the “C” of “CENTS”, are narrower and less clear on #3 than on #1.  
  3. On #3, the left-most tip of the white lace frill on Franklin’s shirt touches the oval level with the top left corner of the number “5”.  On #1, the tip of the lace touches the oval level with the top left corner of the “F” in FIVE”.
  4. The line forming the right-hand side of the “N” in “CENTS” is pointed on the bottom on #3, instead of slightly squared off, as it is on #1.  
 
 
  
 
#4 – 10¢ 1875 George Washington vs. 1847 #2
 
  1. #4 was issued without gum; #2 was gummed.
  2. The original printers’ initials (R, W, H and E for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch, and Edson), which you’ll find below the “C” of “CENTS”, are narrower and less clear on #4 than on #2.  
  3. The placement of the edges of Washington’s coat differs between the #4 and the #2.  On #4, the left vertical edge touches the oval at the right-hand tip of the X.  The right vertical edge touches it at the center of the “S” in “CENTS”.  On #2, the left edge touches the oval at the center of the “T” in “TEN” and on the right, it touches between the “T” and “S” of “CENTS”.  
  4. Washington’s eyes have a slightly sleepy appearance on #4, and his mouth forms a straight line.  On #2 he looks more alert with an upward curve to his mouth. 
  5. The line forming the right-hand side of the “N” in “CENTS” at the bottom is pointed on #4, instead of slightly squared off, as it is on #2. 
 
 
 
 
Now you know how to tell the differences between these rare stamps.  Get set to dazzle your fellow collectors with your knowledge!