#3000e – 1995 32c "Krazy Kat"

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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U.S. #3000e
32¢ Krazy Kat
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Kat loves Mouse. Mouse, who dislikes Kat, angrily tosses bricks. Kat takes this sign of affection. Kop secretly loves Kat, which gives him extra reason to enforce law and order. This was the comics’ “eternal triangle.” Although few understood Krazy Kat, everyone knew its creator, George Herriman, was a genius.
 
The strip was begun by Herriman as a cat-and-mouse chase in his Dingbat Family strip. In October 1913, Krazy got his own strip, and thus began the imaginative fantasy life of Krazy, Ignatz Mouse, and the other inhabitants of Kokonino County. A visit to cartoonist James Swinnerton (creator of Little Jimmy) began a lifelong love affair with the Arizona deserts, whose scenery often turned up as bizarre landscapes in Krazy’s world.
 
Ironically, Krazy Kat, which has become the most highly-praised of all comic strips, was not very popular during the years it ran in newspapers. Having only a few dozen subscribers, compared to hundreds for its better-known contemporaries, the strip mainly owed its existence to the fact that publisher William Randolph Hearst was an avid follower. The strip ended with Herriman’s death in 1944, and it wasn’t until years later that Herriman’s genius was recognized.
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U.S. #3000e
32¢ Krazy Kat
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Kat loves Mouse. Mouse, who dislikes Kat, angrily tosses bricks. Kat takes this sign of affection. Kop secretly loves Kat, which gives him extra reason to enforce law and order. This was the comics’ “eternal triangle.” Although few understood Krazy Kat, everyone knew its creator, George Herriman, was a genius.
 
The strip was begun by Herriman as a cat-and-mouse chase in his Dingbat Family strip. In October 1913, Krazy got his own strip, and thus began the imaginative fantasy life of Krazy, Ignatz Mouse, and the other inhabitants of Kokonino County. A visit to cartoonist James Swinnerton (creator of Little Jimmy) began a lifelong love affair with the Arizona deserts, whose scenery often turned up as bizarre landscapes in Krazy’s world.
 
Ironically, Krazy Kat, which has become the most highly-praised of all comic strips, was not very popular during the years it ran in newspapers. Having only a few dozen subscribers, compared to hundreds for its better-known contemporaries, the strip mainly owed its existence to the fact that publisher William Randolph Hearst was an avid follower. The strip ended with Herriman’s death in 1944, and it wasn’t until years later that Herriman’s genius was recognized.