#3136j – 1997 32c Dinosaurs: Einiosaurus

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.80
$1.80
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM420545x37mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$5.75
$5.75
- MM68645x38mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$5.75
$5.75
U.S. #3136j
1997 32¢ Einiosaurus
Dinosaurs

Issue Date: May 1, 1997
City: Grand Junction, CO
Quantity: 219,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
One of the last main groups of dinosaurs to appear were the ceratopsians or horned dinosaurs. These formidable-looking creatures were equipped with enormous frills and fearsome horns. In fact, fully a third of their length was devoted to their long skulls and solid bone frills. Later ceratopsians frequently attained a length of 25 feet and a weight of 5 tons – certainly enough bulk to put lethal thrust behind their horns, which could be three feet in length. 
 
A newcomer to the dinosaur line-up, Einiosaurus (EYE-nee-oh-SAWR-us) was discovered in 1986. But it wasn’t until 1995 that the public first learned about the “buffalo lizard.” Like other ceratopsians, he was a dangerous-looking creature, sporting two long spikes on the back of his frill and a nose horn that curved forward like a can opener.
 
Fossilized footprints suggest the Einiosaurus and other horned dinosaurs lived in herds. When threatened by a predator, they undoubtedly gathered in a tight group with their young protected in the middle. Facing outward, they presented a massive wall of sharp spikes. And certainly, given their size, their sharp horns were strategically positioned for delivering belly wounds to the likes of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2021 First-Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty 2021 First Class Forever Stamps - Garden Beauty

    In 2021, the United States Postal Service anticipated the arrival of spring with a new set of 10 Forever stamps honoring Garden Beauty.  Order yours today!

    $10.95- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels  May Include Targets, Stars, Numbers, or Grids. Set of 5 with small imperfections Pre 1900 Fancy Cancels
    Since they first appeared in the 19th century, fancy cancels have been extremely sought-after by collectors.  Act now to add five of these to your collection.  Stamps may vary, but that's half the fun!
    $12.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 1950s First Day Covers, Collection of 100
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the American flag, Alexander Hamilton, Religious Freedom, Overland Mail, NATO, and more.  This money saving offer saves you over $90!  Order your set today.
    $89.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3136j
1997 32¢ Einiosaurus
Dinosaurs

Issue Date: May 1, 1997
City: Grand Junction, CO
Quantity: 219,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
One of the last main groups of dinosaurs to appear were the ceratopsians or horned dinosaurs. These formidable-looking creatures were equipped with enormous frills and fearsome horns. In fact, fully a third of their length was devoted to their long skulls and solid bone frills. Later ceratopsians frequently attained a length of 25 feet and a weight of 5 tons – certainly enough bulk to put lethal thrust behind their horns, which could be three feet in length. 
 
A newcomer to the dinosaur line-up, Einiosaurus (EYE-nee-oh-SAWR-us) was discovered in 1986. But it wasn’t until 1995 that the public first learned about the “buffalo lizard.” Like other ceratopsians, he was a dangerous-looking creature, sporting two long spikes on the back of his frill and a nose horn that curved forward like a can opener.
 
Fossilized footprints suggest the Einiosaurus and other horned dinosaurs lived in herds. When threatened by a predator, they undoubtedly gathered in a tight group with their young protected in the middle. Facing outward, they presented a massive wall of sharp spikes. And certainly, given their size, their sharp horns were strategically positioned for delivering belly wounds to the likes of Tyrannosaurus Rex.