#3136j – 1997 32c Dinosaurs - Einiosaurus

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.80
3 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mystic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
camera Classic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.75
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.20
Grading Guide

U.S. #3136j
1997 32¢ Einiosaurus
Dinosaurs

Issue Date: May 1, 1997
City: Grand Junction, CO
Quantity: 219,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
One of the last main groups of dinosaurs to appear were the ceratopsians or horned dinosaurs. These formidable-looking creatures were equipped with enormous frills and fearsome horns. In fact, fully a third of their length was devoted to their long skulls and solid bone frills. Later ceratopsians frequently attained a length of 25 feet and a weight of 5 tons – certainly enough bulk to put lethal thrust behind their horns, which could be three feet in length. 
 
A newcomer to the dinosaur line-up, Einiosaurus (EYE-nee-oh-SAWR-us) was discovered in 1986. But it wasn’t until 1995 that the public first learned about the “buffalo lizard.” Like other ceratopsians, he was a dangerous-looking creature, sporting two long spikes on the back of his frill and a nose horn that curved forward like a can opener.
 
Fossilized footprints suggest the Einiosaurus and other horned dinosaurs lived in herds. When threatened by a predator, they undoubtedly gathered in a tight group with their young protected in the middle. Facing outward, they presented a massive wall of sharp spikes. And certainly, given their size, their sharp horns were strategically positioned for delivering belly wounds to the likes of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3136j
1997 32¢ Einiosaurus
Dinosaurs

Issue Date: May 1, 1997
City: Grand Junction, CO
Quantity: 219,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
One of the last main groups of dinosaurs to appear were the ceratopsians or horned dinosaurs. These formidable-looking creatures were equipped with enormous frills and fearsome horns. In fact, fully a third of their length was devoted to their long skulls and solid bone frills. Later ceratopsians frequently attained a length of 25 feet and a weight of 5 tons – certainly enough bulk to put lethal thrust behind their horns, which could be three feet in length. 
 
A newcomer to the dinosaur line-up, Einiosaurus (EYE-nee-oh-SAWR-us) was discovered in 1986. But it wasn’t until 1995 that the public first learned about the “buffalo lizard.” Like other ceratopsians, he was a dangerous-looking creature, sporting two long spikes on the back of his frill and a nose horn that curved forward like a can opener.
 
Fossilized footprints suggest the Einiosaurus and other horned dinosaurs lived in herds. When threatened by a predator, they undoubtedly gathered in a tight group with their young protected in the middle. Facing outward, they presented a massive wall of sharp spikes. And certainly, given their size, their sharp horns were strategically positioned for delivering belly wounds to the likes of Tyrannosaurus Rex.