#3137a//3391a – 1997-2000 Looney Tunes Stamps, set 4

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U.S. #3137a//3391a
1997-2000 Warner Brothers
4 Stamps
 
Bugs Bunny
The Bugs Bunny stamp was issued in conjunction with a campaign to launch the U.S.P.S.'s "Stampers" program. As the official mascot of Stampers, it was hoped the animated character would help revive youth interest in the hobby of stamp collecting. A full-color, 12-page magazine was made available through the U.S.P.S. Philatelic Fulfillment Service Center for a limited time, as part of the Stampers program.
 
Since his big-screen debut in 1940, Bugs Bunny and his trademark greeting, “Eh, what’s up, Doc?” have become fixtures of American popular culture. Best known for his uproarious performances in Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodie cartoons, Bugs also appeared in newspaper comics, comic books, and children’s books.
 
Sylvester and Tweety
Generations of Americans have enjoyed the playful antics of Sylvester and Tweety. Two of Warner Bros. funniest characters, the pair has engaged in a never-ending chase which ultimately ends in frustration for Sylvester.
 
Sylvester the cat made his debut in the short animated film, Life With Feathers, in which he uttered the line, which would become his trademark, “Sufferin’ succotash!” Tweety, a wide-eyed, baby-like bird debuted in the Merrie Melodies short A Tale of Two Kitties. Tweety’s innocent remark, “I tawt I taw a puddy tat!,” was the perfect foil to his otherwise precocious, and often brutal, actions.
 
These remarkable characters have starred together in 41 cartoons, and continue to spread their special humor on Saturday morning cartoons and on Warner Bros. own cable television network. 
 
Daffy Duck
Since his debut performance in the short animated film “Porky’s Duck Hunt,” Daffy Duck has appeared in more than 120 cartoons, often co-starring with Porky Pig and Bugs Bunny. It wasn’t until later that the character’s eccentric behavior would earn him the name “Daffy” Duck.
 
Daffy Duck and Porky Pig were an established team during Daffy Duck’s early years of stardom. The duck’s aggressive style complemented the pig’s less confident demeanor. Although Daffy Duck and Porky Pig became a successful duo, producers later developed a more volatile combination: Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny.
 
The Daffy Duck character became less wild and more sly when faced with the naturally cool and quick Bugs Bunny. Daffy Duck’s greed, haste, and disregard for warnings set him up for failure every time, and his attempts to outwit Bugs Bunny are always unsuccessful. Audiences admire Daffy Duck because, regardless of the conspiracy against him, he never gives up.
 
Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner
Wile E. Coyote is always more humiliated than harmed by his failure to catch Road Runner. Even with his faults, the audience's sympathy remains with Wile E., and the hope endures that someday Wile E. Coyote will catch Road Runner. 
 
 
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U.S. #3137a//3391a
1997-2000 Warner Brothers
4 Stamps
 
Bugs Bunny
The Bugs Bunny stamp was issued in conjunction with a campaign to launch the U.S.P.S.'s "Stampers" program. As the official mascot of Stampers, it was hoped the animated character would help revive youth interest in the hobby of stamp collecting. A full-color, 12-page magazine was made available through the U.S.P.S. Philatelic Fulfillment Service Center for a limited time, as part of the Stampers program.
 
Since his big-screen debut in 1940, Bugs Bunny and his trademark greeting, “Eh, what’s up, Doc?” have become fixtures of American popular culture. Best known for his uproarious performances in Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodie cartoons, Bugs also appeared in newspaper comics, comic books, and children’s books.
 
Sylvester and Tweety
Generations of Americans have enjoyed the playful antics of Sylvester and Tweety. Two of Warner Bros. funniest characters, the pair has engaged in a never-ending chase which ultimately ends in frustration for Sylvester.
 
Sylvester the cat made his debut in the short animated film, Life With Feathers, in which he uttered the line, which would become his trademark, “Sufferin’ succotash!” Tweety, a wide-eyed, baby-like bird debuted in the Merrie Melodies short A Tale of Two Kitties. Tweety’s innocent remark, “I tawt I taw a puddy tat!,” was the perfect foil to his otherwise precocious, and often brutal, actions.
 
These remarkable characters have starred together in 41 cartoons, and continue to spread their special humor on Saturday morning cartoons and on Warner Bros. own cable television network. 
 
Daffy Duck
Since his debut performance in the short animated film “Porky’s Duck Hunt,” Daffy Duck has appeared in more than 120 cartoons, often co-starring with Porky Pig and Bugs Bunny. It wasn’t until later that the character’s eccentric behavior would earn him the name “Daffy” Duck.
 
Daffy Duck and Porky Pig were an established team during Daffy Duck’s early years of stardom. The duck’s aggressive style complemented the pig’s less confident demeanor. Although Daffy Duck and Porky Pig became a successful duo, producers later developed a more volatile combination: Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny.
 
The Daffy Duck character became less wild and more sly when faced with the naturally cool and quick Bugs Bunny. Daffy Duck’s greed, haste, and disregard for warnings set him up for failure every time, and his attempts to outwit Bugs Bunny are always unsuccessful. Audiences admire Daffy Duck because, regardless of the conspiracy against him, he never gives up.
 
Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner
Wile E. Coyote is always more humiliated than harmed by his failure to catch Road Runner. Even with his faults, the audience's sympathy remains with Wile E., and the hope endures that someday Wile E. Coyote will catch Road Runner.