#3142q – 1997 32c Classic American Aircraft: DC-3

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.75
$1.75
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77748x38mm 5 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50
U.S. #3142q
1997 32¢ Douglas DC-3
Classic American Aircraft

Issue Date: July 19, 1997
City: Dayton, OH
Quantity: 161,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
When the first DC-3 rolled down the runway in 1934, few knew it was destined to become the most famous commercial airplane ever built. Though not the first low-wing monoplane in a world still dominated by biplanes, it was immediately popular with airlines in America and Europe. It was easy to fly and had the passenger comforts so lacking in the Tri-Motor. 
 
With the outbreak of World War II, the Douglas Aircraft Corporation went into immediate mass-production. Altogether, 10,000 DC-3s ferried thousands of U.S. and British servicemen as C-47 Skytrains, and Dakotas respectively. Converted to civilian use after the war, the DC-3 became the world’s principal airliner and biggest moneymaker in its class. As late as 1965, DC-3s still outnumbered all other types of airliners.
 
More than anything else, the DC-3 was an indestructible workhorse because it was a stress-skinned “fail-safe” airplane. Prior to DC-3s, airplanes had a lifespan of about 6,000 hours and had a tendency to come apart at the seams when a structural member broke. When a wing spar in the DC-3 broke, the weight was picked up by alternate spars. This type of construction eliminated catastrophic chain reactions and reduced fatigue, which in turn, enormously increased its safety and its lifespan.
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3142q
1997 32¢ Douglas DC-3
Classic American Aircraft

Issue Date: July 19, 1997
City: Dayton, OH
Quantity: 161,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
When the first DC-3 rolled down the runway in 1934, few knew it was destined to become the most famous commercial airplane ever built. Though not the first low-wing monoplane in a world still dominated by biplanes, it was immediately popular with airlines in America and Europe. It was easy to fly and had the passenger comforts so lacking in the Tri-Motor. 
 
With the outbreak of World War II, the Douglas Aircraft Corporation went into immediate mass-production. Altogether, 10,000 DC-3s ferried thousands of U.S. and British servicemen as C-47 Skytrains, and Dakotas respectively. Converted to civilian use after the war, the DC-3 became the world’s principal airliner and biggest moneymaker in its class. As late as 1965, DC-3s still outnumbered all other types of airliners.
 
More than anything else, the DC-3 was an indestructible workhorse because it was a stress-skinned “fail-safe” airplane. Prior to DC-3s, airplanes had a lifespan of about 6,000 hours and had a tendency to come apart at the seams when a structural member broke. When a wing spar in the DC-3 broke, the weight was picked up by alternate spars. This type of construction eliminated catastrophic chain reactions and reduced fatigue, which in turn, enormously increased its safety and its lifespan.