#3151j – 1997 32c "Scootles"

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Grading Guide

U.S. #3151j
1997 32¢ Scootles
Classic American Dolls

Issue Date: July 28, 1997
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 7,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
10.9 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1909 American illustrator Rose O’Neill published a drawing of a character with large round eyes, a pug nose, and a curved line mouth. Modeled after her baby brother, she named the impish character “Kewpie” – short for cupid. By 1913 George Borgfeldt & Company had begun producing Kewpie dolls. Adorable and appealing, the dolls were immensely popular, and millions of Kewpies were made of a variety of materials.
 
Another Rose O’Neill creation, Scootles first appeared as a drawing in the Ladies Home Journal in April 1925. Like its cousin Kewpie, Scootles had an upturned nose, a closed smiling mouth, and round eyes, which glanced mischievously sideways. Rather than the trademark blond tuft of hair though, Scootles sported blond curls. Hoping to recapture the popularity of the Kewpie, George Borgfeldt & Company secured rights to produce a Scootles doll, which was designed by Joseph Kallus (who also modeled the Kewpie doll). Although strikingly similar, Scootles never reached the same degree of popularity as the Kewpies.
 
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U.S. #3151j
1997 32¢ Scootles
Classic American Dolls

Issue Date: July 28, 1997
City: Anaheim, CA
Quantity: 7,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
10.9 x 11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1909 American illustrator Rose O’Neill published a drawing of a character with large round eyes, a pug nose, and a curved line mouth. Modeled after her baby brother, she named the impish character “Kewpie” – short for cupid. By 1913 George Borgfeldt & Company had begun producing Kewpie dolls. Adorable and appealing, the dolls were immensely popular, and millions of Kewpies were made of a variety of materials.
 
Another Rose O’Neill creation, Scootles first appeared as a drawing in the Ladies Home Journal in April 1925. Like its cousin Kewpie, Scootles had an upturned nose, a closed smiling mouth, and round eyes, which glanced mischievously sideways. Rather than the trademark blond tuft of hair though, Scootles sported blond curls. Hoping to recapture the popularity of the Kewpie, George Borgfeldt & Company secured rights to produce a Scootles doll, which was designed by Joseph Kallus (who also modeled the Kewpie doll). Although strikingly similar, Scootles never reached the same degree of popularity as the Kewpies.