#3184i – 1998 32c Radio-America single CTC pane

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
3 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mystic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
camera Classic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.00
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.20
Grading Guide

U.S. #3184i
32¢ Radio Entertains America
Celebrate the Century – 1920s
 
Issue Date: May 28, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
As early as 1920, Westinghouse employee Frank Conrad attempted to broadcast both live performances and phonograph records from his home in Pittsburgh. Sensing a whole new market, Westinghouse encouraged him to used a more powerful station installed in the Westinghouse plant. Conrad agreed and the station was finished in time for him to broadcast the 1920 presidential election returns. With this, a whole new era in American life began.
 
America accepted radio with an enthusiasm that had never been seen before. By 1922 there were 30 such stations, and by 1923 there were 556. The number of homes with radios tripled during this same period.
 
Finally, people could experience events without leaving the comfort of their homes. Music could be enjoyed without purchasing a record or a phonograph; plays and concerts could be attended without ever buying a ticket; news could be heard without a newspaper; and sporting events could be followed without going to the stadium. Radio also led to family bonding, as parents and children gathered around to listen to the latest episode of their favorite serial program. Life, as Americans knew it, was forever changed by this technological wonder.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3184i
32¢ Radio Entertains America
Celebrate the Century – 1920s
 
Issue Date: May 28, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
As early as 1920, Westinghouse employee Frank Conrad attempted to broadcast both live performances and phonograph records from his home in Pittsburgh. Sensing a whole new market, Westinghouse encouraged him to used a more powerful station installed in the Westinghouse plant. Conrad agreed and the station was finished in time for him to broadcast the 1920 presidential election returns. With this, a whole new era in American life began.
 
America accepted radio with an enthusiasm that had never been seen before. By 1922 there were 30 such stations, and by 1923 there were 556. The number of homes with radios tripled during this same period.
 
Finally, people could experience events without leaving the comfort of their homes. Music could be enjoyed without purchasing a record or a phonograph; plays and concerts could be attended without ever buying a ticket; news could be heard without a newspaper; and sporting events could be followed without going to the stadium. Radio also led to family bonding, as parents and children gathered around to listen to the latest episode of their favorite serial program. Life, as Americans knew it, was forever changed by this technological wonder.