#3246 – 1998 32c Contemporary Christmas: Victorian Wreath, booklet single

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$3.75FREE with 650 points!
$3.75
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.90
$0.90
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM639215x35mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50730x34mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420430x34mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #3246
32¢ Victorian Wreath
Contemporary Christmas
 
Issue Date: October 15, 1998
City: Christmas, MI
Quantity: 116,760,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 11.3 x 11.7
Color: Multicolored
 
In 19th-century England, the ornamental Victorian style of design adorned furniture, buildings, and decor. The style also influenced people’s lifestyles, and even their Christmas customs. The typical scene from a Victorian Christmas is a splendid array of gifts, happy children, and a candle-lit tree. Many of these Victorian customs were also popular in colonial America.
 
Displaying the Christmas tree became popular in England after 1841, when Prince Albert presented a decorated evergreen to Queen Victoria and the royal family. Although not a new practice, decorating the tree with fruit, nuts, candy, cookies, and trinkets was accepted by English people immediately.
 
On the streets of Victorian England, one would greet bell-ringers, carolers, and most importantly, toy-sellers. After seeing the peddler’s animated rabbits, walking dolls, and lifelike soldiers, children would hurry home and address a letter to Father Christmas. 
 
Sending brilliantly colored greeting cards was popular among the English during this time, the custom having begun there. The first known Christmas card was produced by businessman Henry Cole in 1843 as a way to offer holiday greetings without having to write hundreds of personal messages.
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s US Frst Day Cover Collection, Set of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #3246
32¢ Victorian Wreath
Contemporary Christmas
 
Issue Date: October 15, 1998
City: Christmas, MI
Quantity: 116,760,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine die cut 11.3 x 11.7
Color: Multicolored
 
In 19th-century England, the ornamental Victorian style of design adorned furniture, buildings, and decor. The style also influenced people’s lifestyles, and even their Christmas customs. The typical scene from a Victorian Christmas is a splendid array of gifts, happy children, and a candle-lit tree. Many of these Victorian customs were also popular in colonial America.
 
Displaying the Christmas tree became popular in England after 1841, when Prince Albert presented a decorated evergreen to Queen Victoria and the royal family. Although not a new practice, decorating the tree with fruit, nuts, candy, cookies, and trinkets was accepted by English people immediately.
 
On the streets of Victorian England, one would greet bell-ringers, carolers, and most importantly, toy-sellers. After seeing the peddler’s animated rabbits, walking dolls, and lifelike soldiers, children would hurry home and address a letter to Father Christmas. 
 
Sending brilliantly colored greeting cards was popular among the English during this time, the custom having begun there. The first known Christmas card was produced by businessman Henry Cole in 1843 as a way to offer holiday greetings without having to write hundreds of personal messages.