#3910e – 2005 37c Modern American Architecture: Walt Disney Concert Hall

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U.S. #3910e
37¢ Walt Disney Concert Hall
Modern American Architecture


Issue Date: May 19, 2005
City: Las Vegas, NV
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 11
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Walt Disney Concert Hall
In 1987, Lillian Disney donated $50 million to build a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Her husband Walt Disney had loved classical music. The project took 16 years to complete, required over 30,000 architectural drawings, and cost more than five times the original donation.
 
Frank Gehry won the competition to design the new hall. Gehry was born in Toronto in 1929. He remembers making “little cities” out of scrap wood as a boy. In 1947, his family moved to Los Angeles. Gehry studied architecture at the University of Southern California.
 
According to Gehry, the Walt Disney Concert Hall was designed from the inside out. He created a curving, symmetrical interior in Douglas fir, designed with the help of acoustic expert Yasuhisa Toyota. Seats were placed around all sides of the stage. It was important to Gehry that “the musicians could come on stage, feel at home, and hear each other,” and also that “the orchestra and the audience would have an intimate connection with each other.”
 
Interestingly, Gehry developed his plans with the aid of software used to design fighter planes. The resulting stainless steel exterior forms a stunning organic sculpture. Gehry’s work illustrates the artistic aspect of architecture.
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U.S. #3910e
37¢ Walt Disney Concert Hall
Modern American Architecture


Issue Date: May 19, 2005
City: Las Vegas, NV
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 11
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Walt Disney Concert Hall
In 1987, Lillian Disney donated $50 million to build a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Her husband Walt Disney had loved classical music. The project took 16 years to complete, required over 30,000 architectural drawings, and cost more than five times the original donation.
 
Frank Gehry won the competition to design the new hall. Gehry was born in Toronto in 1929. He remembers making “little cities” out of scrap wood as a boy. In 1947, his family moved to Los Angeles. Gehry studied architecture at the University of Southern California.
 
According to Gehry, the Walt Disney Concert Hall was designed from the inside out. He created a curving, symmetrical interior in Douglas fir, designed with the help of acoustic expert Yasuhisa Toyota. Seats were placed around all sides of the stage. It was important to Gehry that “the musicians could come on stage, feel at home, and hear each other,” and also that “the orchestra and the audience would have an intimate connection with each other.”
 
Interestingly, Gehry developed his plans with the aid of software used to design fighter planes. The resulting stainless steel exterior forms a stunning organic sculpture. Gehry’s work illustrates the artistic aspect of architecture.