#3910i – 2005 37c Modern American Architecture: Yale Art and Architecture Bldg.

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U.S. #3910i
37¢ Yale Art and Architecture Building
Modern American Architecture


Issue Date: May 19, 2005
City: Las Vegas, NV
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 11
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Yale Art and Architecture Building
The Yale Art and Architecture Building in New Haven, Connecticut, finished in 1963, is Paul Rudolph’s most famous work. The interior is a series of intricate, interlocking spaces – there are more than 35 different levels on seven stories. Huge concrete slabs bridge the hollow towers that contain stairs, elevators, and mechanical systems.
 
Paul Rudolph (1918-97) was born in Kentucky, a preacher’s son. In 1947, he earned a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard. He served as Chairman of the Architecture Department at Yale from 1958 to 1965.
 
To give the solid walls a distinctive texture, Rudolph ordered the workers to smash the ribbed concrete with hammers. The dean of the School of Art complained about the result, “...if you stumble into a wall you may end up going to the hospital with skin abrasions.”
 
The artists’ studios on the top floor were small and without the north light so valued by painters. The sculptors, who need space, were in a low-ceilinged sub-basement. (Both have since moved to other buildings.)
 
A Modernist architect, Rudolph combined massive forms with complex interior spaces. He designed light, elegant private homes, multiple family housing, and public buildings in a career that lasted fifty years.
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U.S. #3910i
37¢ Yale Art and Architecture Building
Modern American Architecture


Issue Date: May 19, 2005
City: Las Vegas, NV
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 11
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Yale Art and Architecture Building
The Yale Art and Architecture Building in New Haven, Connecticut, finished in 1963, is Paul Rudolph’s most famous work. The interior is a series of intricate, interlocking spaces – there are more than 35 different levels on seven stories. Huge concrete slabs bridge the hollow towers that contain stairs, elevators, and mechanical systems.
 
Paul Rudolph (1918-97) was born in Kentucky, a preacher’s son. In 1947, he earned a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard. He served as Chairman of the Architecture Department at Yale from 1958 to 1965.
 
To give the solid walls a distinctive texture, Rudolph ordered the workers to smash the ribbed concrete with hammers. The dean of the School of Art complained about the result, “...if you stumble into a wall you may end up going to the hospital with skin abrasions.”
 
The artists’ studios on the top floor were small and without the north light so valued by painters. The sculptors, who need space, were in a low-ceilinged sub-basement. (Both have since moved to other buildings.)
 
A Modernist architect, Rudolph combined massive forms with complex interior spaces. He designed light, elegant private homes, multiple family housing, and public buildings in a career that lasted fifty years.