#4271 – 2008 42c Hearts bklt

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.65
$1.65
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM215610 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 32 x 39 millimeters (1-1/4 x 1-9/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.50
$1.50
- MM72850 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 32 x 39 millimeters (1-1/4 x 1-9/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.75
$3.75

2008 42¢ Wedding Heart

Issue Date:  June 10, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

Hearts are recognized around the world as the universal symbol of love.  Often red in color to signify passion, the origin of the heart-shaped symbol is uncertain.  The Catholic Church teaches that the first heart symbol appeared in the 17th century.  It was then that Saint Margaret Marie Alacoque saw in a dream the Sacred Heart surrounded by a crown of thorns.  Others maintain the shape was an attempt to draw the human heart long before that time. 

The heart shape gained popularity during the Victorian Era because of an increased interest in Valentine’s Day.  The Duke of Orleans sent the first Valentine’s Day message to his wife in 1415, while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London. 

According to legend, the February holiday honors a priest named Valentine.  When Rome’s Emperor Claudius II banned marriage because he felt single men made better soldiers, Valentine defied the order and secretly performed many weddings.  St. Valentine lost his life in Rome about 270 A.D. for his good deeds. 

Weddings are the outward declaration of love, an emotion described by Aristotle, who wrote: “Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.” 

Hearts, the symbol of love and marriage, have been chosen for 2008 one-ounce stamp in the Wedding Series.

Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

2008 42¢ Wedding Heart

Issue Date:  June 10, 2008
City:  Washington, DC

Hearts are recognized around the world as the universal symbol of love.  Often red in color to signify passion, the origin of the heart-shaped symbol is uncertain.  The Catholic Church teaches that the first heart symbol appeared in the 17th century.  It was then that Saint Margaret Marie Alacoque saw in a dream the Sacred Heart surrounded by a crown of thorns.  Others maintain the shape was an attempt to draw the human heart long before that time. 

The heart shape gained popularity during the Victorian Era because of an increased interest in Valentine’s Day.  The Duke of Orleans sent the first Valentine’s Day message to his wife in 1415, while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London. 

According to legend, the February holiday honors a priest named Valentine.  When Rome’s Emperor Claudius II banned marriage because he felt single men made better soldiers, Valentine defied the order and secretly performed many weddings.  St. Valentine lost his life in Rome about 270 A.D. for his good deeds. 

Weddings are the outward declaration of love, an emotion described by Aristotle, who wrote: “Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.” 

Hearts, the symbol of love and marriage, have been chosen for 2008 one-ounce stamp in the Wedding Series.