#4347 – 2008 42c Sunflower

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.65
$1.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM76830x32mm 25 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.25
$3.25

U.S. #4347
Sunflower

Issue Date: August 15, 2008
City:
Hartford, CT

Native to the Americas, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is a tall annual plant with a large flowering head.  Sunflowers often grow to heights of eight to twelve feet.  Shorter varieties are frequently used for cut flower arrangements, while large varieties provide brilliant splashes of color in outdoor gardens. 

Commonly referred to as a flower, the sunflower head is actually made up of many smaller flowers.  The sterile outer flowers, or ray florets, may be a variety of bright colors.  The inner disc florets mature into the fruit of the plant, which are generally called sunflower seeds.

Immature sunflower plants are heliotropic, or sun-tracking.  After following the sun from east to west, sunflowers return to face the east at dusk.  The movement is performed by a flexible segment of the stem below the bud.  As the plant matures, the stem stiffens and blooms appear.

Native Americans were the first to cultivate sunflowers.  In addition to attracting birds and wildlife, sunflowers are a source of seeds for snacking, oil that may be used for cooking, and livestock feed.

The sunflower, which is Kansas’ state flower, thrives in temperate regions across the United States.  The 2008 42¢ First Class stamp pictures a sunflower in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4347
Sunflower

Issue Date: August 15, 2008
City:
Hartford, CT

Native to the Americas, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is a tall annual plant with a large flowering head.  Sunflowers often grow to heights of eight to twelve feet.  Shorter varieties are frequently used for cut flower arrangements, while large varieties provide brilliant splashes of color in outdoor gardens. 

Commonly referred to as a flower, the sunflower head is actually made up of many smaller flowers.  The sterile outer flowers, or ray florets, may be a variety of bright colors.  The inner disc florets mature into the fruit of the plant, which are generally called sunflower seeds.

Immature sunflower plants are heliotropic, or sun-tracking.  After following the sun from east to west, sunflowers return to face the east at dusk.  The movement is performed by a flexible segment of the stem below the bud.  As the plant matures, the stem stiffens and blooms appear.

Native Americans were the first to cultivate sunflowers.  In addition to attracting birds and wildlife, sunflowers are a source of seeds for snacking, oil that may be used for cooking, and livestock feed.

The sunflower, which is Kansas’ state flower, thrives in temperate regions across the United States.  The 2008 42¢ First Class stamp pictures a sunflower in Santa Fe, New Mexico.