#4457 – 2010 44c Adopt a Shelter Pet-Black,White

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U.S. #4457
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Color: Multicolored
 
She was a young domestic shorthair, found in a dumpster with her kittens – afraid but protective of her litter. The kittens were easily gathered, but their mother was hesitant. A few days later, she was captured and taken to the shelter. Her kittens quickly found homes, but being older, she stayed at the shelter for a few weeks. At last she was adopted by a loving family, looking for another cat to add to the two they already owned. Now, she spends her days with her new friends, sleeping in the sun and enjoying her new life.
 
This mother was one of the fortunate few. Unlike dogs, 75% of cats arrive at their new home in an unscripted manner – as gifts, taken in as a favor, or the cat simply wanders up and sticks around. Once they’ve been informally adopted, the cats may receive the food and attention they need, but not the medical care.
 
That medical care includes spaying and neutering, which is critical in preventing the current nationwide cat overpopulation crisis from growing. 
 
According to estimates, the average stray female cat will have 22 kittens in her lifetime. Over a three-year period, she and her unspayed female offspring can be responsible for over 800 new kittens. Without the intervention of adoptive owners, many will repeat the pregnancy cycle, or perish.
 
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U.S. #4457
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Color: Multicolored
 
She was a young domestic shorthair, found in a dumpster with her kittens – afraid but protective of her litter. The kittens were easily gathered, but their mother was hesitant. A few days later, she was captured and taken to the shelter. Her kittens quickly found homes, but being older, she stayed at the shelter for a few weeks. At last she was adopted by a loving family, looking for another cat to add to the two they already owned. Now, she spends her days with her new friends, sleeping in the sun and enjoying her new life.
 
This mother was one of the fortunate few. Unlike dogs, 75% of cats arrive at their new home in an unscripted manner – as gifts, taken in as a favor, or the cat simply wanders up and sticks around. Once they’ve been informally adopted, the cats may receive the food and attention they need, but not the medical care.
 
That medical care includes spaying and neutering, which is critical in preventing the current nationwide cat overpopulation crisis from growing. 
 
According to estimates, the average stray female cat will have 22 kittens in her lifetime. Over a three-year period, she and her unspayed female offspring can be responsible for over 800 new kittens. Without the intervention of adoptive owners, many will repeat the pregnancy cycle, or perish.