#4548 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - U.S. Merchant Marine: Clipper Ship

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.80
$1.80
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.50
$0.50
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00
$8.00
U.S. #4548
2011 44¢ Clipper Ship
Merchant Marine
Issue Date: July 28, 2011
City: Great Neck, NY
Quantity: 60,000,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color:
multicolored
In the 19th century, world trade had become increasingly important to many countries. Ships brought cargo and passengers to port more quickly than traveling by land. When gold was discovered in California, fortune seekers wanted to sail around South America as quickly as possible to claim their treasure. They were also in a rush for supplies. Clipper ships proved to be the fastest method to get people and goods to the gold mines.
 
By the end of the century, clipper ships ruled the seas. Designed to “clip” over the waves with their raised bows and long, narrow form, they could out-sail older ships. The multiple masts held up to 35 sails, which caught the slightest breeze and moved the ships along at higher speeds. The rigging that controlled the sails was complicated, and when a sailor mastered it, he had “learned the ropes.”
 
Competition between clippers became fierce. In 1854, the Sovereign of the Seas set the record for the fastest speed for a sailing ship at 22 knots, just over 25 m.p.h. This ship was the first to travel more than 400 miles in 24 hours. It took a crew of 105 mariners to keep her sailing smoothly.
 
The merchants who sailed these beautiful clipper ships braved many dangers to transport cargo and passengers to distant ports.

 

 

Read More - Click Here

  • 1855-2016 Mystic's Historic Stamps of the United States Album and FREE 100 Used Stamps, 1000 Hinges and Collecting Guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #4548
2011 44¢ Clipper Ship
Merchant Marine

Issue Date: July 28, 2011
City: Great Neck, NY
Quantity: 60,000,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color:
multicolored

In the 19th century, world trade had become increasingly important to many countries. Ships brought cargo and passengers to port more quickly than traveling by land. When gold was discovered in California, fortune seekers wanted to sail around South America as quickly as possible to claim their treasure. They were also in a rush for supplies. Clipper ships proved to be the fastest method to get people and goods to the gold mines.
 
By the end of the century, clipper ships ruled the seas. Designed to “clip” over the waves with their raised bows and long, narrow form, they could out-sail older ships. The multiple masts held up to 35 sails, which caught the slightest breeze and moved the ships along at higher speeds. The rigging that controlled the sails was complicated, and when a sailor mastered it, he had “learned the ropes.”
 
Competition between clippers became fierce. In 1854, the Sovereign of the Seas set the record for the fastest speed for a sailing ship at 22 knots, just over 25 m.p.h. This ship was the first to travel more than 400 miles in 24 hours. It took a crew of 105 mariners to keep her sailing smoothly.
 
The merchants who sailed these beautiful clipper ships braved many dangers to transport cargo and passengers to distant ports.