#4908-09c – 2014 First-Class Forever Stamp - Imperforate Hot Rods

U.S. #4908-09c

2014 49¢ Hot Rods Imperforate

Pair

 

The First Day of Issue ceremony for this pair of stamps took place at National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” The stamps picture different views of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.

 

In many respects, hot rods and the people who pioneered them were the beginning of rebellious youth culture. Soldiers returning from World War II, feeling no fear after the horrors they had witnessed, took fast, inexpensive cars and made them even faster. Then they raced the hot rods through deserts, abandoned airstrips, and crowded Los Angeles streets. It was dangerous and illegal – and absolutely thrilling.

 

Drag racing also became a cultural phenomenon. Leather jackets, blue jeans, and white T-shirts made up the hot rodder’s uniform. Tattoos made statements, which often defied parents and the establishment.

 

In time, modifying a car to increase performance was not enough to satisfy the hot rod fanatics. Customizing a roadster became as much about how the car looked as how it raced, and the artisans who created them became famous. Swirling flames, pinstripes, and metal-flake paint jobs helped create moving works of art that attracted attention and converted skeptics into fans.

 

More recently, a new type of hot rod has appeared. “Rat rods” are a throwback to the original modified cars. Stripped down, grimey, and unpainted, these vehicles often feature vintage engines. A new culture that embraces the ‘40s and ‘50s has grown around them, offering a nostalgic glimpse back in history.

 

The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.

 

49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate

Issue Date: June 6, 2014

City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”

Category: Definitive

Printed By: CCL Label Inc.

Printing Method: Photogravure in double-sided booklets of 20

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today. 

 

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U.S. #4908-09c

2014 49¢ Hot Rods Imperforate

Pair

 

The First Day of Issue ceremony for this pair of stamps took place at National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” The stamps picture different views of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.

 

In many respects, hot rods and the people who pioneered them were the beginning of rebellious youth culture. Soldiers returning from World War II, feeling no fear after the horrors they had witnessed, took fast, inexpensive cars and made them even faster. Then they raced the hot rods through deserts, abandoned airstrips, and crowded Los Angeles streets. It was dangerous and illegal – and absolutely thrilling.

 

Drag racing also became a cultural phenomenon. Leather jackets, blue jeans, and white T-shirts made up the hot rodder’s uniform. Tattoos made statements, which often defied parents and the establishment.

 

In time, modifying a car to increase performance was not enough to satisfy the hot rod fanatics. Customizing a roadster became as much about how the car looked as how it raced, and the artisans who created them became famous. Swirling flames, pinstripes, and metal-flake paint jobs helped create moving works of art that attracted attention and converted skeptics into fans.

 

More recently, a new type of hot rod has appeared. “Rat rods” are a throwback to the original modified cars. Stripped down, grimey, and unpainted, these vehicles often feature vintage engines. A new culture that embraces the ‘40s and ‘50s has grown around them, offering a nostalgic glimpse back in history.

 

The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.

 

49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate

Issue Date: June 6, 2014

City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”

Category: Definitive

Printed By: CCL Label Inc.

Printing Method: Photogravure in double-sided booklets of 20

Perforations: Imperforate

Self-adhesive

 

Scarce Modern Imperforates

The modern imperforate stamps are one of the hottest stories around.  In 2012, the U.S. Postal Service released some issues as press sheets.  The sheets with die cut perforations were issued in limited quantities. 

 

To the surprise of many collectors, officials then issued a small number of press sheets without perforations.  The uncut sheets were only available in Kansas City, Missouri, yet most sold out immediately.  In an instant, the imperforate stamp sheets became modern rarities.  For example, only 75,000 Baseball All-Star se-tenant sheets were issued compared to 118,000 Bugs Bunny sheets with the 10th stamp imperforate.

 

In a controversial move, the editors of Scott Catalogue announced they would not list or give numbers to these stamps because they did not fit Scott guidelines.  This decision was strongly debated since the imperforate stamps are valid for postage.  They eventually decided to give the stamps minor numbers and have continued issuing imperforates in the years since.

 

Because they were issued in such limited quantities, these scarce modern imperforates can be difficult to find.  Luckily Mystic purchased a small number of each imperforate stamp issued so you can add these modern rarities to your collection.  Be one of the lucky few – order today.