#516 – 1917 30c Franklin, orange red

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U.S. #516

1917-19 30¢ Franklin

 

The end of World War I marked a dramatic increase in Parcel Post mail, which made stamps with high denominations in more demand than ever before.  This use made U.S. #516 a commonly used stamp.  Printed several times to meet the demand, U.S. #516 shares the wide range of color shades seen with other high-denomination stamps.

 

Flat Plate, Perf. 11

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing continued to use the 10 gauge perforation machines on flat plate stamp sheets even after 11 perf. stamps proved successful.  In an effort to save money, they used the perf. 10 wheels until they wore out.  Beginning in early 1917, stamps produced on flat plate presses were given 11 gauge perfs.

 

That marked the beginning of the flat plate perforated 11 Series of 1917-19 stamps.  Perf. 12 had proven too flimsy, and perf. 10 was too difficult to separate without damaging the stamp, so perf. 11 became a satisfactory solution.

 

30¢ Franklin

Issue Date: May 1917

Category: Definitive

Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Method:  Flat plate, using plates of 400 with four panes of 100

Watermark:  None

Perforation: 11

Color: Orange red

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U.S. #516

1917-19 30¢ Franklin

 

The end of World War I marked a dramatic increase in Parcel Post mail, which made stamps with high denominations in more demand than ever before.  This use made U.S. #516 a commonly used stamp.  Printed several times to meet the demand, U.S. #516 shares the wide range of color shades seen with other high-denomination stamps.

 

Flat Plate, Perf. 11

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing continued to use the 10 gauge perforation machines on flat plate stamp sheets even after 11 perf. stamps proved successful.  In an effort to save money, they used the perf. 10 wheels until they wore out.  Beginning in early 1917, stamps produced on flat plate presses were given 11 gauge perfs.

 

That marked the beginning of the flat plate perforated 11 Series of 1917-19 stamps.  Perf. 12 had proven too flimsy, and perf. 10 was too difficult to separate without damaging the stamp, so perf. 11 became a satisfactory solution.

 

30¢ Franklin

Issue Date: May 1917

Category: Definitive

Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Method:  Flat plate, using plates of 400 with four panes of 100

Watermark:  None

Perforation: 11

Color: Orange red

Water-activated Gum