#5393 – 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - George H.W. Bush

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U.S. #5393

2019 55¢ George H.W. Bush 

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 12, 2019
First Day City:  College Station, TX
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  40,000,000
 
George H.W. Bush is often considered one of the most qualified candidates to hold the office of president of the United States.  He served in the military and had a long political career before he entered the White House.  And as vice president to Ronald Reagan, he saw first-hand what it took to lead America. While president, Bush led the United States through several crisis situations, such as conflicts in Panama, the Middle East, and the growing drug threat at home.  Bush encouraged community volunteering, passed the Clean Air Act, and is credited with bringing an end to the Cold War, which helped make the world a safer place for all nations.  Bush's retirement years were just as active as his time in office. For his lifetime of achievements, George H.W. Bush received a number of commendations.  This included the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and an honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II (he was only the third US president in history to receive this title). President George H.W. Bush passed away on Novembe 30, 2018, and was honored on a US postage stamp the following year.  Though he is gone, Bush's lifetime of achievements ahve earned him our lasting admiration and respect..

The Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee

1964 Fine Arts stamp
US #1259 – CSAC was created to bring more modern artistry to US stamps.

On April 30, 1957, the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee opened its first meeting.  The committee receives tens of thousands of stamp proposals every year and passes on their recommendations to the US postmaster general who makes the final decision.

1943 Nations United stamp
US #907 was based on a design submitted by the Committee of Volunteer Artists in 1942.

As early as the 1930s, some began suggesting that the US Post Office have an advisory committee to improve stamp designs.  At the time, other nations were issuing colorful stamps with modern, graphic designs.  In 1941, New York advertising art director Paul Berdanier created a Committee of Volunteer Artists to help improve stamp art.  In 1942, the committee held an informal competition to design two new stamps.  Leon Helguera’s sketch was selected for the Nations United for Victory stamp and Paul Manship’s plaster cast was chosen for the Four Freedoms stamp, though both designs were changed significantly by the Post Office.

There was little progress in the years to come, with most stamps designed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.  Among the critics of the stamps of this period was George Linn, founder of Linn’s Stamp News, who remarked that “poor taste for design and color has been shown by the ‘deciders’ [who] govern such things in the capital.”

2017 Andrew Wyeth stamp sheet
US #5212 – Wyeth served on the committee from 1966 to 1967.

After Dwight Eisenhower was elected, his postmaster general, Arthur E. Summerfield, sought to improve the quality of stamp designs and take some of the pressure off the government.  He worked out an arrangement with the Commission of Fine Arts and the National Academy of Design to create a committee of artists that could offer insight on stamp designs.  However, no formal meeting was ever held, and the artists were only briefly consulted a couple times.

2008 James A. Michener stamp
US #3427A – Michener served on the committee from 1979 to 1986.

Then in 1957, Summerfield’s special assistant for public information, L. Rohe Walter, stepped in.  He realized that a more popular stamp program could improve public relations and pushed for the creation of the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC).  It was officially established on March 21, 1957.  According to an announcement a few days later, “The Stamp Advisory Committee shall advise the Post Office Department on any matters pertaining to the subject matter, design, production and issuance of postage stamps.”

2019 George H.W. Bush stamp
US #5393 – CSAC approves issuing presidential memorial stamps after their death.

CSAC held its first meeting on April 30, 1957.  The seven-member committee included three stamp collectors, three artists and a person from the US Information Agency.  While the committee struggled to convince the Post Office to expand color printing, they were credited with improving stamp designs and were later awarded the Post Office Department’s Benjamin Franklin Service Award.

In the years since, CSAC has expanded to include anywhere from 10 to 15 members at a time.  The committee generally meets four times per year to discuss possible stamp subjects.  They receive an average of 40,000 stamp suggestions every year and consider every single one of them, even if just briefly.  If they approve a subject, it is then passed on to the postmaster general who makes the final decision.  CSAC also works closely with artists to develop the final stamp designs.

1997 Air Force stamp
US #3167 – CSAC supports the issue of stamps honoring the major military branches and academies on 50 year anniversaries.  They don’t generally approve of stamps honoring individual units because there are so many across all the branches.

Anyone who wishes to submit a topic for consideration must submit it in writing, at least three years before it would be issued, to allow ample time for research and approval.  CSAC doesn’t accept proposals in person, by telephone, or email.  They also set strict criteria for subjects to be considered.  The subjects must be American or American-related.  Historical events and statehood anniversaries will be considered for commemoration in multiples of 50 years.  Subjects should have widespread national appeal and honor “positive contributions to American life, history, culture and environment.”  The committee strives to include stamps that reflect all areas of American culture including individuals, history, culture, sports, science, and technology.

Find out more about CSAC here.

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U.S. #5393

2019 55¢ George H.W. Bush 

Value:  55¢ 1-ounce First-class rate (Forever)
Issue Date:  June 12, 2019
First Day City:  College Station, TX
Type of Stamp:  Commemorative
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Pane of 20
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  40,000,000
 

George H.W. Bush is often considered one of the most qualified candidates to hold the office of president of the United States.  He served in the military and had a long political career before he entered the White House.  And as vice president to Ronald Reagan, he saw first-hand what it took to lead America.

While president, Bush led the United States through several crisis situations, such as conflicts in Panama, the Middle East, and the growing drug threat at home.  Bush encouraged community volunteering, passed the Clean Air Act, and is credited with bringing an end to the Cold War, which helped make the world a safer place for all nations.  Bush's retirement years were just as active as his time in office.

For his lifetime of achievements, George H.W. Bush received a number of commendations.  This included the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and an honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II (he was only the third US president in history to receive this title).

President George H.W. Bush passed away on Novembe 30, 2018, and was honored on a US postage stamp the following year.  Though he is gone, Bush's lifetime of achievements ahve earned him our lasting admiration and respect..

The Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee

1964 Fine Arts stamp
US #1259 – CSAC was created to bring more modern artistry to US stamps.

On April 30, 1957, the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee opened its first meeting.  The committee receives tens of thousands of stamp proposals every year and passes on their recommendations to the US postmaster general who makes the final decision.

1943 Nations United stamp
US #907 was based on a design submitted by the Committee of Volunteer Artists in 1942.

As early as the 1930s, some began suggesting that the US Post Office have an advisory committee to improve stamp designs.  At the time, other nations were issuing colorful stamps with modern, graphic designs.  In 1941, New York advertising art director Paul Berdanier created a Committee of Volunteer Artists to help improve stamp art.  In 1942, the committee held an informal competition to design two new stamps.  Leon Helguera’s sketch was selected for the Nations United for Victory stamp and Paul Manship’s plaster cast was chosen for the Four Freedoms stamp, though both designs were changed significantly by the Post Office.

There was little progress in the years to come, with most stamps designed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.  Among the critics of the stamps of this period was George Linn, founder of Linn’s Stamp News, who remarked that “poor taste for design and color has been shown by the ‘deciders’ [who] govern such things in the capital.”

2017 Andrew Wyeth stamp sheet
US #5212 – Wyeth served on the committee from 1966 to 1967.

After Dwight Eisenhower was elected, his postmaster general, Arthur E. Summerfield, sought to improve the quality of stamp designs and take some of the pressure off the government.  He worked out an arrangement with the Commission of Fine Arts and the National Academy of Design to create a committee of artists that could offer insight on stamp designs.  However, no formal meeting was ever held, and the artists were only briefly consulted a couple times.

2008 James A. Michener stamp
US #3427A – Michener served on the committee from 1979 to 1986.

Then in 1957, Summerfield’s special assistant for public information, L. Rohe Walter, stepped in.  He realized that a more popular stamp program could improve public relations and pushed for the creation of the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC).  It was officially established on March 21, 1957.  According to an announcement a few days later, “The Stamp Advisory Committee shall advise the Post Office Department on any matters pertaining to the subject matter, design, production and issuance of postage stamps.”

2019 George H.W. Bush stamp
US #5393 – CSAC approves issuing presidential memorial stamps after their death.

CSAC held its first meeting on April 30, 1957.  The seven-member committee included three stamp collectors, three artists and a person from the US Information Agency.  While the committee struggled to convince the Post Office to expand color printing, they were credited with improving stamp designs and were later awarded the Post Office Department’s Benjamin Franklin Service Award.

In the years since, CSAC has expanded to include anywhere from 10 to 15 members at a time.  The committee generally meets four times per year to discuss possible stamp subjects.  They receive an average of 40,000 stamp suggestions every year and consider every single one of them, even if just briefly.  If they approve a subject, it is then passed on to the postmaster general who makes the final decision.  CSAC also works closely with artists to develop the final stamp designs.

1997 Air Force stamp
US #3167 – CSAC supports the issue of stamps honoring the major military branches and academies on 50 year anniversaries.  They don’t generally approve of stamps honoring individual units because there are so many across all the branches.

Anyone who wishes to submit a topic for consideration must submit it in writing, at least three years before it would be issued, to allow ample time for research and approval.  CSAC doesn’t accept proposals in person, by telephone, or email.  They also set strict criteria for subjects to be considered.  The subjects must be American or American-related.  Historical events and statehood anniversaries will be considered for commemoration in multiples of 50 years.  Subjects should have widespread national appeal and honor “positive contributions to American life, history, culture and environment.”  The committee strives to include stamps that reflect all areas of American culture including individuals, history, culture, sports, science, and technology.

Find out more about CSAC here.