#5548 – 2021 36c Barns: Forebay Barn in Spring

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U.S. #5548

2021 36¢ Barns – Forebay Barn in Spring


Value:  36¢ Postcard rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  January 24, 2021

First Day City:  Barnesville, GA

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  100,000,000

  A Pennsylvania barn is a barn design popular in the United States from around 1790 to 1900.  It can be easily distinguished from other barn types by a prominent forebay.  A forebay is a place on the barn where one or more walls overshoot the foundation.  Most Pennsylvania barns have gable roofs and almost all were built into the sides of hills.  This allowed the farmer to easily access the basement and the ground level of the barn.

Historian Robert Ensminger has divided Pennsylvania barns into three distinct types:  standard, Sweitzer, and extended Pennsylvania barns.  According to Ensminger, "The standard Pennsylvania barn is the most numerous and widely distributed class of the Pennsylvania barns."  He goes on to name the Sweitzer as "the original Pennsylvania barn."  The extended pennsylvania was a larger version of the standard.

Pennsylvania barns became popular as they could be built to suit any farmer's needs.  They could range from 20 feet long to over 100.  They could be used to keep horses or cows, or even sheep or pigs.  Animals were kept on the lower level while the upper level was used to process and store hay and grain.

Pennsylvania barns have stood the test of time, and many historic buildings can be found throughout America today.  

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U.S. #5548

2021 36¢ Barns – Forebay Barn in Spring


Value:  36¢ Postcard rate (Forever)

Issue Date:  January 24, 2021

First Day City:  Barnesville, GA

Type of Stamp:  Commemorative

Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America

Printing Method:  Offset

Format:  Pane of 20

Self-Adhesive

Quantity Printed:  100,000,000

 

A Pennsylvania barn is a barn design popular in the United States from around 1790 to 1900.  It can be easily distinguished from other barn types by a prominent forebay.  A forebay is a place on the barn where one or more walls overshoot the foundation.  Most Pennsylvania barns have gable roofs and almost all were built into the sides of hills.  This allowed the farmer to easily access the basement and the ground level of the barn.

Historian Robert Ensminger has divided Pennsylvania barns into three distinct types:  standard, Sweitzer, and extended Pennsylvania barns.  According to Ensminger, "The standard Pennsylvania barn is the most numerous and widely distributed class of the Pennsylvania barns."  He goes on to name the Sweitzer as "the original Pennsylvania barn."  The extended pennsylvania was a larger version of the standard.

Pennsylvania barns became popular as they could be built to suit any farmer's needs.  They could range from 20 feet long to over 100.  They could be used to keep horses or cows, or even sheep or pigs.  Animals were kept on the lower level while the upper level was used to process and store hay and grain.


Pennsylvania barns have stood the test of time, and many historic buildings can be found throughout America today.