#722 – 1932 3c Washington, deep violet, horizontal perf 10

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.95FREE with 730 points!
$2.95
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.65
$0.65
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.95
$1.95
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.45
$0.45
8 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #722
1932 3¢ George Washington

Issue Date: October 12, 1932
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 35,988,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 Horizontally
Color: Deep Violet
 
U.S. #722 had a limited demand, since end coil stamps were only used in certain vending machines. It remained in production for eight years.
 
George Washington’s Most Famous Portrait Was Never Finished
 
George Washington’s image on U.S. #722 was taken from a painting by artist Gilbert Stuart. Stuart was a well-known portrait artist who had established a studio in Philadelphia. It was where in 1796 he would paint what would become the most famous portrait of George Washington. And it was a painting he never finished.
 
Stuart began a painting of Washington that, after completing his face and upper torso, he never finished. However, he and his daughters would use that painting as the model for 130 reproductions. It came to be called “The Athenaeum,” and its image is still used on the one-dollar bill. “The Athenaeum” hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The image was also used on the 1932 Commemorative U.S. stamps.
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2018 First-Class Forever Stamp - The Art of Magic souvenir sheet of 3 2018 First-Class Forever Stamp - The Art of Magic souvenir sheet of 3

    At the 2018 Art of Magic First Day of Issue, the USPS surprised collectors with a souvenir sheet of three unreleased designs.  These stamps featured lenticular printing, making the white rabbit appear to pop in and out of the top hat. Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $7.50- $1,250.00
    BUY NOW
  • 1970s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1970s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers celebrated the accomplishments of George R. Clark, General Douglas MacArthur, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and more.  I also noticed a stamp commemorating the 1974 World’s Fair.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Mixture, 1lb on/off paper US One Pound Mixture on and off paper

    Just how many stamps are in a pound?  Contents will vary, but the mix I looked at included over 2,000!  Included on- and off-paper stamps (we'll send you instructions for soaking stamps).  Order your mix today and enjoy hours of collecting fun.

    $39.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #722
1932 3¢ George Washington

Issue Date: October 12, 1932
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 35,988,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 Horizontally
Color: Deep Violet
 
U.S. #722 had a limited demand, since end coil stamps were only used in certain vending machines. It remained in production for eight years.
 
George Washington’s Most Famous Portrait Was Never Finished
 
George Washington’s image on U.S. #722 was taken from a painting by artist Gilbert Stuart. Stuart was a well-known portrait artist who had established a studio in Philadelphia. It was where in 1796 he would paint what would become the most famous portrait of George Washington. And it was a painting he never finished.
 
Stuart began a painting of Washington that, after completing his face and upper torso, he never finished. However, he and his daughters would use that painting as the model for 130 reproductions. It came to be called “The Athenaeum,” and its image is still used on the one-dollar bill. “The Athenaeum” hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The image was also used on the 1932 Commemorative U.S. stamps.