#778 – 1936 3c TIPEX s/s

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$3.50FREE with 1,130 points!
$3.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$3.75
$3.75
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$2.50FREE with 550 points!
$2.50
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$2.75FREE with 610 points!
$2.75
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM2228103x73mm 1 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mount
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.50
$1.50
- MM655240x73mm 10 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.95
$8.95
 
U.S. #778
1936 Third International Philatelic Exposition
Souvenir Sheet

Issue Date: May 9, 1936
First City: New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 2,809,039
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate
Perforation: None
Color: Violet
 
On May 9, 1936, the Post Office Department issued U.S. # 778 to salute the Third International Philatelic Exhibition, held in New York City on May 9-17, 1936. The souvenir sheet included four different postage stamps, all of which had been issued individually during the past year. Each stamp carried a 3¢ denomination. The stamps commemorate the Connecticut Tercentenary, the California Pacific Exposition, the Michigan Centennial, and the Texas Centennial. 
 
300th Anniversary of Connecticut Settlement
 
The Connecticut Tercentenary celebrated the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Connecticut. Dissatisfied colonists from Massachusetts left their original settlements and came to Connecticut in search of religious and political freedom. In 1636, the early settlements of Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor united to form the Connecticut colony. King Charles II of England granted the colony its first charter in 1662. In 1687, after several attempts to gain control of the colony, Sir Edmund Andros, the governor of several other New England colonies, demanded Connecticut’s charter, but the people refused. Supposedly, they had hidden it in the oak tree pictured on the 3¢ stamp.
 
California World’s Fair
 
The California-Pacific International Exposition was a world’s fair held in San Diego in 1935. The stamp commemorating this event depicts a view of the exposition. Many of the ornate buildings constructed specifically for the exposition still stand today in Balboa Park. The park, which lies in the heart of the city, houses various museums and cultural centers.
 
Michigan – A Century of Statehood
 
Michigan became our 26th state when it was admitted to the Union in 1837. This centennial issue honored the state’s 100th anniversary. In the early 1900s, Michigan became the nation’s leading producer of automobiles. It was in Detroit that Henry Ford built his first workable automobile in 1896. Three years later, Ransom E. Olds established the first automobile factory – Oldsmobile – in Detroit.
 
Texas Celebrates 100 Years of Independence
 
The Texas Centennial honored the 100th anniversary of Texas independence. Once part of Mexico, Texas was first colonized by Americans in 1821. Using land his father had received from the Mexican government, Stephen Austin brought 300 families to Texas and organized the San Felipe de Austin colony along the Brazos River. Other Americans obtained land grants from Mexico for colonies, and by 1830, the number of settlers had grown to 20,000.
 
Desiring a separate government, the American colonists revolted against Mexico in 1835. Under General Sam Houston, the Texans captured General Antonio López de Santa Ana and crushed his forces at the Battle of San Jacinto. The victory ended the war and guaranteed Texan independence. Established in 1836, the new Republic of Texas elected Sam Houston as its first president. It remained a republic for ten years, until it joined the Union in 1845 as our 28th state.
 
 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #778
1936 Third International Philatelic Exposition
Souvenir Sheet

Issue Date: May 9, 1936
First City: New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 2,809,039
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat Plate
Perforation: None
Color: Violet
 
On May 9, 1936, the Post Office Department issued U.S. # 778 to salute the Third International Philatelic Exhibition, held in New York City on May 9-17, 1936. The souvenir sheet included four different postage stamps, all of which had been issued individually during the past year. Each stamp carried a 3¢ denomination. The stamps commemorate the Connecticut Tercentenary, the California Pacific Exposition, the Michigan Centennial, and the Texas Centennial. 
 
300th Anniversary of Connecticut Settlement
 
The Connecticut Tercentenary celebrated the 300th anniversary of the settlement of Connecticut. Dissatisfied colonists from Massachusetts left their original settlements and came to Connecticut in search of religious and political freedom. In 1636, the early settlements of Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor united to form the Connecticut colony. King Charles II of England granted the colony its first charter in 1662. In 1687, after several attempts to gain control of the colony, Sir Edmund Andros, the governor of several other New England colonies, demanded Connecticut’s charter, but the people refused. Supposedly, they had hidden it in the oak tree pictured on the 3¢ stamp.
 
California World’s Fair
 
The California-Pacific International Exposition was a world’s fair held in San Diego in 1935. The stamp commemorating this event depicts a view of the exposition. Many of the ornate buildings constructed specifically for the exposition still stand today in Balboa Park. The park, which lies in the heart of the city, houses various museums and cultural centers.
 
Michigan – A Century of Statehood
 
Michigan became our 26th state when it was admitted to the Union in 1837. This centennial issue honored the state’s 100th anniversary. In the early 1900s, Michigan became the nation’s leading producer of automobiles. It was in Detroit that Henry Ford built his first workable automobile in 1896. Three years later, Ransom E. Olds established the first automobile factory – Oldsmobile – in Detroit.
 
Texas Celebrates 100 Years of Independence
 
The Texas Centennial honored the 100th anniversary of Texas independence. Once part of Mexico, Texas was first colonized by Americans in 1821. Using land his father had received from the Mexican government, Stephen Austin brought 300 families to Texas and organized the San Felipe de Austin colony along the Brazos River. Other Americans obtained land grants from Mexico for colonies, and by 1830, the number of settlers had grown to 20,000.
 
Desiring a separate government, the American colonists revolted against Mexico in 1835. Under General Sam Houston, the Texans captured General Antonio López de Santa Ana and crushed his forces at the Battle of San Jacinto. The victory ended the war and guaranteed Texan independence. Established in 1836, the new Republic of Texas elected Sam Houston as its first president. It remained a republic for ten years, until it joined the Union in 1845 as our 28th state.