#926 – 1944 3c 50th Anniversary of Motion Pictures

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U.S. #926
3¢ Motion Pictures

Issue Date: October 31, 1944
City: Hollywood, CA; New York, NY
Quantity: 53,479,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Deep violet
 
U.S. #926 commemorates the 50th anniversary of motion pictures. Debuting in 1895, the motion picture greatly enriched people’s lives. Often, troops stationed overseas were shown currently released movies to help keep them in good spirits. The image of troops watching a film was selected for this stamp to show the impact motion pictures had on the nation during the war. Many movies of the era were produced to raise morale, while others served as informational films, educating the public and troops on the war.
 
Developing Motion Picture Technology
Inventor Thomas Edison earned the nickname “The Wizard of Menlo Park” from the many important inventions he created at his workshop in Menlo Park, New Jersey.  During the late 1880s, Thomas Edison began working on motion picture technology. Starting with the work of George Eastman and other inventors, Edison developed an improved camera. In 1914, Edison made progress connecting the phonograph to the camera to make “talking pictures.” Later, other inventors improved upon Edison’s ideas.
 
Edison built a motion picture studio in New Jersey, and the industry quickly began to flourish. Fort Lee, New Jersey, became the motion picture capitol of the world during the early 1900s. This booming movie business attracted a great deal of investment, and an entire industry quickly evolved in New Jersey. However, the warmer and more cost-effective climate of California quickly attracted the movie studio. By the 1930s, nearly all of the movie-making industry was located on the West Coast.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #926. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.
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U.S. #926
3¢ Motion Pictures

Issue Date: October 31, 1944
City: Hollywood, CA; New York, NY
Quantity: 53,479,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Deep violet
 
U.S. #926 commemorates the 50th anniversary of motion pictures. Debuting in 1895, the motion picture greatly enriched people’s lives. Often, troops stationed overseas were shown currently released movies to help keep them in good spirits. The image of troops watching a film was selected for this stamp to show the impact motion pictures had on the nation during the war. Many movies of the era were produced to raise morale, while others served as informational films, educating the public and troops on the war.
 
Developing Motion Picture Technology
Inventor Thomas Edison earned the nickname “The Wizard of Menlo Park” from the many important inventions he created at his workshop in Menlo Park, New Jersey.  During the late 1880s, Thomas Edison began working on motion picture technology. Starting with the work of George Eastman and other inventors, Edison developed an improved camera. In 1914, Edison made progress connecting the phonograph to the camera to make “talking pictures.” Later, other inventors improved upon Edison’s ideas.
 
Edison built a motion picture studio in New Jersey, and the industry quickly began to flourish. Fort Lee, New Jersey, became the motion picture capitol of the world during the early 1900s. This booming movie business attracted a great deal of investment, and an entire industry quickly evolved in New Jersey. However, the warmer and more cost-effective climate of California quickly attracted the movie studio. By the 1930s, nearly all of the movie-making industry was located on the West Coast.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #926. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.