#928 – 1945 5c UN Peace Conference

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U.S. #928
5¢ United Nations Peace Conference

Issue Date: April 25, 1945
City: San Francisco, CA
Quantity: 75,500,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Ultramarine
 
President Franklin Roosevelt requested that the design of U.S. #928, commemorating the United Nations Peace Conference, be as simple as possible. He suggested the wording “Toward United Nations.” He also requested that the stamp have a 5¢ denomination so it could be used to send foreign first-class mail. 
 
Unfortunately, President Roosevelt, who for so long had worked for world peace and a United Nations, died just two weeks before the U.N. conference, making this the last stamp issued during his era.
 
Forming the United Nations
When 46 nations gathered in San Francisco on April 25, 1945, they were exhausted from the extended war, disheartened by the inhumanity they’d seen, and determined to prevent future generations from experiencing what they had seen firsthand. Their ultimate goal was to form an international organization that would have the power to maintain security and foster prosperity and give human rights an international legal status.
 
A group of non-governmental organizations lobbied vigorously for a strong commitment to human rights in the U.N. Charter. In particular, several small Latin American countries were committed to the inclusion of such a guarantee. A Pan-American conference held in Mexico City produced a group united in their determination to see such goals met. A number of American non-governmental groups also pushed for a type of “bill of rights” in the charter. Over 1,300 organizations placed ads in newspapers demanding that human rights be an integral part of the international organization.
 
When the member nations met in San Francisco in April of 1945, their proposal fell short of the clear and concise commitment to human rights that these groups sought. Forty-two American groups serving as consultants to the U.S. delegation convinced participating governments of the need to clearly state a policy of protection for individual human rights. They were persuasive, and the result was a legal commitment by governments around the world to promote and encourage respect for the inalienable human rights of every man, woman, and child.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #928. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.
 
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U.S. #928
5¢ United Nations Peace Conference

Issue Date: April 25, 1945
City: San Francisco, CA
Quantity: 75,500,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Ultramarine
 
President Franklin Roosevelt requested that the design of U.S. #928, commemorating the United Nations Peace Conference, be as simple as possible. He suggested the wording “Toward United Nations.” He also requested that the stamp have a 5¢ denomination so it could be used to send foreign first-class mail. 
 
Unfortunately, President Roosevelt, who for so long had worked for world peace and a United Nations, died just two weeks before the U.N. conference, making this the last stamp issued during his era.
 
Forming the United Nations
When 46 nations gathered in San Francisco on April 25, 1945, they were exhausted from the extended war, disheartened by the inhumanity they’d seen, and determined to prevent future generations from experiencing what they had seen firsthand. Their ultimate goal was to form an international organization that would have the power to maintain security and foster prosperity and give human rights an international legal status.
 
A group of non-governmental organizations lobbied vigorously for a strong commitment to human rights in the U.N. Charter. In particular, several small Latin American countries were committed to the inclusion of such a guarantee. A Pan-American conference held in Mexico City produced a group united in their determination to see such goals met. A number of American non-governmental groups also pushed for a type of “bill of rights” in the charter. Over 1,300 organizations placed ads in newspapers demanding that human rights be an integral part of the international organization.
 
When the member nations met in San Francisco in April of 1945, their proposal fell short of the clear and concise commitment to human rights that these groups sought. Forty-two American groups serving as consultants to the U.S. delegation convinced participating governments of the need to clearly state a policy of protection for individual human rights. They were persuasive, and the result was a legal commitment by governments around the world to promote and encourage respect for the inalienable human rights of every man, woman, and child.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #928. Introduced to stamp collecting at a young age by his mother, Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned to his collection throughout his life to relax and unwind. 
 
Elected President four times, Roosevelt served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt shared his love of stamps with the nation, personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. He suggested topics, rejected others, and even designed some himself. It was his aim to use stamps not just to send mail but also to educate Americans about our history. And as he entered America into World War II, he saw these stamps as an outlet to raise spirits and bring hope.