#995 – 1950 3c Boy Scouts

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- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
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- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
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- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
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U.S. #995
1950 3¢ Boy Scouts Issue 
 
Issue Date: June 30, 1950
City: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
Quantity: 131,635,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Sepia
 
U.S. #995 is the first U.S. stamp honoring the Boy Scouts of America. It was issued in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, on the opening day of the 1950 Boy Scout Jamboree in that location. The stamp features three Scouts of varying ages (and Scouting levels). The Statue of Liberty is shown in the background, reflecting the 1950 Scout theme “Strengthening the Army of Liberty.”
 
The Scouts camped on the same area as George Washington’s Colonial Army had during the famous 1777-78 winter at Valley Forge. President Harry S Truman spoke at the Jamboree, as did Army General Dwight D. Eisenhower.  
 
Boy Scouts of America
In 1909, American William Boyce became lost on the foggy streets of London. A boy came to Boyce’s aid, guiding him to his destination. When Boyce offered a tip, the boy said, “I am a Scout. I won’t take anything for doing a good turn.” Boyce was so impressed with British Scouting that he brought the idea home to the U.S., founding the Boy Scouts of America in 1910.
 
What began as a single “good turn” on a foggy London night has evolved into a national organization whose members do good deeds. During World War I, Scouts sold $147 million in Liberty Bonds. 
 
Today, Scouting continues to provide an educational program for boys, taught through fun and adventure.  With overnight camping, many physical activities, and volunteer work, Boy Scouts gain self-confidence plus learn teamwork and responsibility. The results are impressive – one of every three West Point cadets was a Boy Scout. And, of the 435 members of the 2010 U.S. Congress, 211 participated in Scouting.
 
The Boy Scouts of America kicked off their 100th anniversary with “A Year of Celebration.” The campaign challenges Boy Scouts to serve as leaders, learn new skills, and participate in community service projects in 2010. Altogether, over 2.7 million U.S. Scouts will step up to the challenge.
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U.S. #995
1950 3¢ Boy Scouts Issue 
 
Issue Date: June 30, 1950
City: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
Quantity: 131,635,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Sepia
 
U.S. #995 is the first U.S. stamp honoring the Boy Scouts of America. It was issued in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, on the opening day of the 1950 Boy Scout Jamboree in that location. The stamp features three Scouts of varying ages (and Scouting levels). The Statue of Liberty is shown in the background, reflecting the 1950 Scout theme “Strengthening the Army of Liberty.”
 
The Scouts camped on the same area as George Washington’s Colonial Army had during the famous 1777-78 winter at Valley Forge. President Harry S Truman spoke at the Jamboree, as did Army General Dwight D. Eisenhower.  
 
Boy Scouts of America
In 1909, American William Boyce became lost on the foggy streets of London. A boy came to Boyce’s aid, guiding him to his destination. When Boyce offered a tip, the boy said, “I am a Scout. I won’t take anything for doing a good turn.” Boyce was so impressed with British Scouting that he brought the idea home to the U.S., founding the Boy Scouts of America in 1910.
 
What began as a single “good turn” on a foggy London night has evolved into a national organization whose members do good deeds. During World War I, Scouts sold $147 million in Liberty Bonds. 
 
Today, Scouting continues to provide an educational program for boys, taught through fun and adventure.  With overnight camping, many physical activities, and volunteer work, Boy Scouts gain self-confidence plus learn teamwork and responsibility. The results are impressive – one of every three West Point cadets was a Boy Scout. And, of the 435 members of the 2010 U.S. Congress, 211 participated in Scouting.
 
The Boy Scouts of America kicked off their 100th anniversary with “A Year of Celebration.” The campaign challenges Boy Scouts to serve as leaders, learn new skills, and participate in community service projects in 2010. Altogether, over 2.7 million U.S. Scouts will step up to the challenge.