1997 32c Classic American Dolls: Johnny Gruelle's "Raggedy Ann"

# 3151c - 1997 32c Classic American Dolls: Johnny Gruelle's "Raggedy Ann"

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US #3151c
1997 Johnny Gruelle’s “Raggedy Ann” – Classic American Dolls

  • Pictures the “Raggedy Ann” doll designed by John B. Gruelle.
  • Part of the Classic American Dolls set – the first time photographs were used instead of paintings or drawings for a large US set with different stamp designs


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Set:  Classic American Dolls
Value:  32¢, First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue:  July 28, 1997
First Day City:  Anaheim, California
Quantity Issued:  105,000,000
Printed by:  Printed for Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. by Sterling Sommer of Tonawanda, New York
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Panes of 15 (Vertical, 5 across, 3 down)
Perforations:  10.9 by 11.1
Tagging:  Large tagging block over all 20 stamps, covering the stamps to the edges

Why the stamp was issued:  To commemorate American doll “Raggedy Ann.”

About the stamp design:  The stamp pictures a photograph of the doll against a blue paper background.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held during the annual membership meeting of the United Federation of Doll Clubs at the Anaheim Hilton and Towers Hotel in Anaheim, California.

About the Classic American Dolls set:  The USPS issued the stamps to commemorate American dolls that “reflect the tradition, heritage, culture, and artistic style from various geographical regions of this country.” 

Each stamp design pictures a photograph by Sally Andersen-Bruce.  Each doll or pair of dolls is shown in front of a blue paper background, tying the stamp designs together.  The names of each doll are printed in small type below the bottom frameline of each stamp, across from the 1997 year date.  They’re also listed in the horizontal selvage at the bottom of the pane of 15.

The set marked the first time photographs were used instead of paintings or drawings for a large US set with different stamp designs.

History the stamp represents:  Without a doubt, Raggedy Ann is one of the most beloved dolls of all time.  A simple cloth doll with bright eyes and smiling mouth, she is impossible not to hug – and perhaps this accounts for the reason sales of the dolls have been astronomical.

The original Raggedy Ann was patented by Johnny Gruelle, a political cartoonist, in 1915.  According to stories, Gruelle took a long-forgotten doll, which he found in his mother’s attic, painted a new face over the faded one, and gave the doll to his daughter Marcella.  Inspired by his daughter’s devotion to the doll, he acquired a patent to create Raggedy Ann (whose name was formed from two popular characters of the day – The Raggedy Man and Little Orphan Annie) commercially.

Originally, the dolls were made in the corner of a friend’s shirt factor by Gruelle’s family.  In 1918, he began a series of stories about Raggedy Ann and her brother Andy’s adventures.  So popular were the stories that demand skyrocketed, and before long the dolls were being mass-produced.

In 1978, one of the original Raggedy Ann dolls made a notable trip to Indianapolis, Gruelle’s birthplace, where she received a key to the city from the mayor.

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US #3151c
1997 Johnny Gruelle’s “Raggedy Ann” – Classic American Dolls

  • Pictures the “Raggedy Ann” doll designed by John B. Gruelle.
  • Part of the Classic American Dolls set – the first time photographs were used instead of paintings or drawings for a large US set with different stamp designs


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Set:  Classic American Dolls
Value:  32¢, First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue:  July 28, 1997
First Day City:  Anaheim, California
Quantity Issued:  105,000,000
Printed by:  Printed for Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd. by Sterling Sommer of Tonawanda, New York
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Panes of 15 (Vertical, 5 across, 3 down)
Perforations:  10.9 by 11.1
Tagging:  Large tagging block over all 20 stamps, covering the stamps to the edges

Why the stamp was issued:  To commemorate American doll “Raggedy Ann.”

About the stamp design:  The stamp pictures a photograph of the doll against a blue paper background.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held during the annual membership meeting of the United Federation of Doll Clubs at the Anaheim Hilton and Towers Hotel in Anaheim, California.

About the Classic American Dolls set:  The USPS issued the stamps to commemorate American dolls that “reflect the tradition, heritage, culture, and artistic style from various geographical regions of this country.” 

Each stamp design pictures a photograph by Sally Andersen-Bruce.  Each doll or pair of dolls is shown in front of a blue paper background, tying the stamp designs together.  The names of each doll are printed in small type below the bottom frameline of each stamp, across from the 1997 year date.  They’re also listed in the horizontal selvage at the bottom of the pane of 15.

The set marked the first time photographs were used instead of paintings or drawings for a large US set with different stamp designs.

History the stamp represents:  Without a doubt, Raggedy Ann is one of the most beloved dolls of all time.  A simple cloth doll with bright eyes and smiling mouth, she is impossible not to hug – and perhaps this accounts for the reason sales of the dolls have been astronomical.

The original Raggedy Ann was patented by Johnny Gruelle, a political cartoonist, in 1915.  According to stories, Gruelle took a long-forgotten doll, which he found in his mother’s attic, painted a new face over the faded one, and gave the doll to his daughter Marcella.  Inspired by his daughter’s devotion to the doll, he acquired a patent to create Raggedy Ann (whose name was formed from two popular characters of the day – The Raggedy Man and Little Orphan Annie) commercially.

Originally, the dolls were made in the corner of a friend’s shirt factor by Gruelle’s family.  In 1918, he began a series of stories about Raggedy Ann and her brother Andy’s adventures.  So popular were the stories that demand skyrocketed, and before long the dolls were being mass-produced.

In 1978, one of the original Raggedy Ann dolls made a notable trip to Indianapolis, Gruelle’s birthplace, where she received a key to the city from the mayor.