2009 44c Early TV Memories: Perry Mason

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Early Television Memories
Perry Mason

 

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“Our family enjoyed watching the ‘Perry Mason’ show.  There was Della’s crush on Perry, and week after week I couldn’t figure out why he didn’t notice and ask her out!  It was a nice clean show.  And his assistant Paul Drake was so handsome!” – Cynthia W.

Dramatic courtroom confessions were standard fare for the longest-running lawyer show on television.  Debuting in 1957, the show was as much about detective work as it was about the law.  The defense attorney was assisted by his junior partner and legal assistant to help his clients.  Armed with a keen mind and cool, penetrating stare, this courtroom avenger always found out the truth.  Last-minute evidence and exciting courtroom climaxes often led to the wrongly accused being spared and the guilty brought to justice.  The show set the standard for other classic criminal dramas.  It lasted for nine years and is still popular in syndication.

Happy Birthday Bette Davis 

Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born on April 5, 1908, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Known as “Betty” from an early age, she attended a Spartan boarding school before moving with her family to New York City in 1921. It was around this time that she changed her name to “Bette” after Honoré de Balzac’s novel La Cousine Bette.

In 1926 Davis attended Henrik Ibsen’s production of The Wild Duck, starting Peg Entwistle. Davis later claimed that it was Entwistle that inspired her to join the theater. She found her first paid acting job as a chorus girl in the play Broadway. Then in 1929 she was hired to play Entwistle’s role in The Wild Duck. Davis went on to perform in theaters in Philadelphia, Washington, and Boston before making her Broadway debut in Broken Dishes in 1929.

The following year Davis moved to Hollywood for her first screen test. Though her first two screen tests didn’t go well, cinematographer Karl Freund remarked that she had “lovely eyes” and recommended her for a part in Bad Sister, which would mark her film debut. Davis then had small parts in a string of unsuccessful movies, which led to plan to move back to New York. But then actor George Arliss suggested she play the female lead in The Man Who Played God. The film was a success and Davis always credited Arliss with helping her get her break in Hollywood.

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Early Television Memories
Perry Mason

 

Issue Date: August 11, 2009
City: North Hollywood, CA

“Our family enjoyed watching the ‘Perry Mason’ show.  There was Della’s crush on Perry, and week after week I couldn’t figure out why he didn’t notice and ask her out!  It was a nice clean show.  And his assistant Paul Drake was so handsome!” – Cynthia W.

Dramatic courtroom confessions were standard fare for the longest-running lawyer show on television.  Debuting in 1957, the show was as much about detective work as it was about the law.  The defense attorney was assisted by his junior partner and legal assistant to help his clients.  Armed with a keen mind and cool, penetrating stare, this courtroom avenger always found out the truth.  Last-minute evidence and exciting courtroom climaxes often led to the wrongly accused being spared and the guilty brought to justice.  The show set the standard for other classic criminal dramas.  It lasted for nine years and is still popular in syndication.

Happy Birthday Bette Davis 

Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born on April 5, 1908, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Known as “Betty” from an early age, she attended a Spartan boarding school before moving with her family to New York City in 1921. It was around this time that she changed her name to “Bette” after Honoré de Balzac’s novel La Cousine Bette.

In 1926 Davis attended Henrik Ibsen’s production of The Wild Duck, starting Peg Entwistle. Davis later claimed that it was Entwistle that inspired her to join the theater. She found her first paid acting job as a chorus girl in the play Broadway. Then in 1929 she was hired to play Entwistle’s role in The Wild Duck. Davis went on to perform in theaters in Philadelphia, Washington, and Boston before making her Broadway debut in Broken Dishes in 1929.

The following year Davis moved to Hollywood for her first screen test. Though her first two screen tests didn’t go well, cinematographer Karl Freund remarked that she had “lovely eyes” and recommended her for a part in Bad Sister, which would mark her film debut. Davis then had small parts in a string of unsuccessful movies, which led to plan to move back to New York. But then actor George Arliss suggested she play the female lead in The Man Who Played God. The film was a success and Davis always credited Arliss with helping her get her break in Hollywood.