#1002 – 1951 3¢ American Chemical Society

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.25
$0.25
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1002
3¢ American Chemical Society

Issue Date: September 4, 1951
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 117,200,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Violet brown
 
Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the American Chemical Society, U.S. #1002 pictures the organization’s emblem along with several instruments related to chemical work, including an alembic, hydrometer, and ionization indicator. 
 

The American Chemical Society

On April 6, 1876, the American Chemical Society was founded in New York City.

Prior to that, there were other American scientific societies, namely the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which was founded in 1848. However, there wasn’t an organization devoted solely to chemistry, which was a fast-growing science. Chemistry is the scientific study of substances, how they behave and change under different conditions, and how they interact.

In 1874, several American chemists met at the home of Joseph Priestley to mark the 100th anniversary of his discovery of oxygen. The chemists that attended that event began discussing the idea of creating a new society that would focus on theoretical and applied chemistry.

After two years of planning, 35 chemists met at the University of the City of New York (today’s New York University). On April 6, 1876, they officially established America’s first chemical society – the American Chemical Society (ACS). At that first meeting, a constitution was adopted, officers were selected, and well-known scientist of the time John William Draper was selected as the first president.

One of the founders, Professor Charles F. Chandler of the Columbia School of Mines, said the society would “prove a powerful and healthy stimulus to original research,… would awaken and develop much talent now wasting in isolation,… [bring] members of the association into closer union, and ensure a better appreciation of our science and its students on the part of the general public.”

The goal of the ACS was to share chemical knowledge with the public and improve the industry’s benefits to mankind and the Earth. Within a year, they obtained a state charter and only a few years later, distributed the first ACS scientific journal.

Now headquartered in Washington, DC, the American Chemical Society’s agenda is multifold. Its purposes are to advance science, advocate for innovation, enable career development, educate the public, support the future of the chemical industry and chemists, and to promote diversity in the field.

Today, this nonprofit organization is the largest scientific society in the world with over 158,000 members. The ACS continues its mission with various publications and more than 30 different technical divisions dedicated to different aspects of chemistry. The society’s best-known publications include the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Chemical Abstracts, and Chemical and Engineering News.

Click here to visit the ACS website.

Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1002
3¢ American Chemical Society

Issue Date: September 4, 1951
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 117,200,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Violet brown
 
Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the American Chemical Society, U.S. #1002 pictures the organization’s emblem along with several instruments related to chemical work, including an alembic, hydrometer, and ionization indicator. 
 

The American Chemical Society

On April 6, 1876, the American Chemical Society was founded in New York City.

Prior to that, there were other American scientific societies, namely the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which was founded in 1848. However, there wasn’t an organization devoted solely to chemistry, which was a fast-growing science. Chemistry is the scientific study of substances, how they behave and change under different conditions, and how they interact.

In 1874, several American chemists met at the home of Joseph Priestley to mark the 100th anniversary of his discovery of oxygen. The chemists that attended that event began discussing the idea of creating a new society that would focus on theoretical and applied chemistry.

After two years of planning, 35 chemists met at the University of the City of New York (today’s New York University). On April 6, 1876, they officially established America’s first chemical society – the American Chemical Society (ACS). At that first meeting, a constitution was adopted, officers were selected, and well-known scientist of the time John William Draper was selected as the first president.

One of the founders, Professor Charles F. Chandler of the Columbia School of Mines, said the society would “prove a powerful and healthy stimulus to original research,… would awaken and develop much talent now wasting in isolation,… [bring] members of the association into closer union, and ensure a better appreciation of our science and its students on the part of the general public.”

The goal of the ACS was to share chemical knowledge with the public and improve the industry’s benefits to mankind and the Earth. Within a year, they obtained a state charter and only a few years later, distributed the first ACS scientific journal.

Now headquartered in Washington, DC, the American Chemical Society’s agenda is multifold. Its purposes are to advance science, advocate for innovation, enable career development, educate the public, support the future of the chemical industry and chemists, and to promote diversity in the field.

Today, this nonprofit organization is the largest scientific society in the world with over 158,000 members. The ACS continues its mission with various publications and more than 30 different technical divisions dedicated to different aspects of chemistry. The society’s best-known publications include the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Chemical Abstracts, and Chemical and Engineering News.

Click here to visit the ACS website.