#1021 – 1953 5¢ Opening of Japan Centennial

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U.S. #1021
5¢ Opening of Japan

Issue Date: July 14, 1953
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 89,289,600
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Green
 
U.S. #1021 commemorates the 100th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry’s negotiations with Japan that opened the nation to trade after more than 200 years of isolation. The stamp pictures Commodore Perry’s ships in Tokyo Bay with Mount Fuji in the background and Perry’s portrait in the upper-right corner.
 
Ending 200 Years of Japanese Isolation
Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry headed a U.S. mission to hostile Japan on July 8, 1853. The mission’s goal was to open Japan for trade and diplomatic relations. Japan had isolated itself from the rest of the world for more than 200 years. 
 
Perry’s stern manner and show of military strength were key to the negotiation of a treaty between the U.S. and Japan in 1854. This was Japan’s first modern treaty with a Western nation, and marked its emergence as a world power. 
 
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U.S. #1021
5¢ Opening of Japan

Issue Date: July 14, 1953
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 89,289,600
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Green
 
U.S. #1021 commemorates the 100th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry’s negotiations with Japan that opened the nation to trade after more than 200 years of isolation. The stamp pictures Commodore Perry’s ships in Tokyo Bay with Mount Fuji in the background and Perry’s portrait in the upper-right corner.
 
Ending 200 Years of Japanese Isolation
Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry headed a U.S. mission to hostile Japan on July 8, 1853. The mission’s goal was to open Japan for trade and diplomatic relations. Japan had isolated itself from the rest of the world for more than 200 years. 
 
Perry’s stern manner and show of military strength were key to the negotiation of a treaty between the U.S. and Japan in 1854. This was Japan’s first modern treaty with a Western nation, and marked its emergence as a world power.